Corporate Strategy

102. There's Always Room for Self Improvement

December 14, 2023 The Corporate Strategy Group Season 3 Episode 41
102. There's Always Room for Self Improvement
Corporate Strategy
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Corporate Strategy
102. There's Always Room for Self Improvement
Dec 14, 2023 Season 3 Episode 41
The Corporate Strategy Group

Ready to tackle the question of emotional intelligence and its impact on your work life balance? We come together in this engaging chat to explore everything from personal sleep patterns to the art and science of emotional intelligence. Using our unique perspectives and experiences, we delve into the concept of open-mindedness and self-reflection, highlighting how these key traits can affect our efficiency and overall performance at work. 

Do you struggle to manage the ever-increasing demands of a bustling work environment? We've got you covered! We discuss the challenges that come with the territory and share advice on everything from task management to mastering time efficiency. We also get real about meeting dynamics and communication, offering insights on maintaining productivity amidst workplace negativity. And if you're grappling with the nuances of a hybrid work environment, we've got some thoughts on striking that delicate balance between friendliness and effectiveness.

Finally, we'd like to take a moment to appreciate you, our listeners. Your engagement fuels our passion and inspires us to deliver the most compelling content. We encourage you to share this treasure trove of corporate strategy wisdom with your friends and colleagues - after all, knowledge is wealth! Stay tuned for our next episode; we can't wait to reconnect and continue this insightful journey together.

Everything Corporate Strategy:
All the links!

Elevator Music by Julian Avila
Promoted by MrSnooze

Don't forget ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ it helps!

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Ready to tackle the question of emotional intelligence and its impact on your work life balance? We come together in this engaging chat to explore everything from personal sleep patterns to the art and science of emotional intelligence. Using our unique perspectives and experiences, we delve into the concept of open-mindedness and self-reflection, highlighting how these key traits can affect our efficiency and overall performance at work. 

Do you struggle to manage the ever-increasing demands of a bustling work environment? We've got you covered! We discuss the challenges that come with the territory and share advice on everything from task management to mastering time efficiency. We also get real about meeting dynamics and communication, offering insights on maintaining productivity amidst workplace negativity. And if you're grappling with the nuances of a hybrid work environment, we've got some thoughts on striking that delicate balance between friendliness and effectiveness.

Finally, we'd like to take a moment to appreciate you, our listeners. Your engagement fuels our passion and inspires us to deliver the most compelling content. We encourage you to share this treasure trove of corporate strategy wisdom with your friends and colleagues - after all, knowledge is wealth! Stay tuned for our next episode; we can't wait to reconnect and continue this insightful journey together.

Everything Corporate Strategy:
All the links!

Elevator Music by Julian Avila
Promoted by MrSnooze

Don't forget ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ it helps!

Speaker 1:

Sorry, I did Clear my throat there, oh you, okay, there's a little bit of a breathe in, spittle out action, so all good.

Speaker 2:

I never want to hear that again.

Speaker 1:

Welcome back to Corporate Strategy, the podcast. That could have been an email I'm Bruce, Not a quote how you doing.

Speaker 2:

Clark, I mean it's the weekend, yeah, it is, it's Sunday. It's weird that we haven't done one. I feel like on a weekend a little while, but man, it feels good. I slept in this morning. Yeah, it was great. The wife took care of the pets so I got to relax, rejuvenate and go for a little walk this morning with the dogs. It was really refreshing.

Speaker 1:

For the listeners who live semi-normal lives what does sleeping in to Clark look like?

Speaker 2:

You say that because my normal days start at five. Is that what you're?

Speaker 1:

talking about yeah, yeah, yeah. So what does sleeping in look like for you?

Speaker 2:

I slept in to like 7.30. No way.

Speaker 1:

Which is like the latest.

Speaker 2:

I slept in for like a long, long time, maybe two and a half years.

Speaker 1:

I sleep very slow, you know you do that. Once you might be getting up at 7.30 every day. I mean, you're not wrong. That's just one step away from crystal meth.

Speaker 2:

I mean, you're just teetering. It is very much a slippery slope, you know it's just a gateway drug Too much sleep equals right in heroin.

Speaker 1:

Why not straight shot into the hardcore drugs?

Speaker 2:

So, but the thing is it's like you know when people, when people are like oh yeah, I just woke up and went to stand up at like 9.30. I'm like I've literally lived like half a day before you even woke up.

Speaker 1:

That's wild to me. That is wild to me. You've lived half a day Not that they woke up and stand up. I'm jealous.

Speaker 2:

You woke up at 9.30 and I've been up for like four and a half hours at that point. So I've literally done everything. I've conquered the world before you even opened your little eyes, wipe the crust out of them. I've been up for hours.

Speaker 1:

It's speaking of sleep, this. You just reminded me this happened. I've always wondered when it was going to happen, and this is the year. 2023 is the year that happened, but I can't sleep in anymore. Oh no, you're old, I'm old, I'm a fish. This is the year that I'm officially old, because I remember I would talk to people who were old and they'd be like, yeah, you just don't sleep in when you get old. I'm like that's so weird.

Speaker 2:

You know the dough is ringing, not the death bell. Sorry, that could have gotten really dark.

Speaker 1:

I mean it is ringing, but yeah, go ahead Every day technically, you're teetering towards death.

Speaker 2:

No the early bird. The early bird special is ringing. They're ringing the bell for you. They'll have your little pancakes ready, little hash browns on the side, and you'll get that discount.

Speaker 1:

Man.

Speaker 2:

That sounds pretty sick. That sounds pretty different on this side of the world. I mean, what time do you go to bed? 11, 12, I'm feeling frisky. That's disgusting. It hits 8.30 and I'm like ready. Dude, you're a mad man, You're an absolute psychopath. 8.30 hits and I'm like now feels like a great time to start shutting the eyes and shutting down.

Speaker 1:

for the 8.30 is like when I'm messaging my boys. I'm like yo, where are we dropping? Who are we shooting? Tonight it's game time. We're going to play till 12 o'clock and then we all have jobs. So we're going to go to bed and feel bad about it.

Speaker 2:

Then it makes sense. See, some people are morning people, Some people are night people, and I'm definitely a morning person. I cannot do evenings Seriously. 8.30 hits my body just shuts down. It's time to go to bed. I would much rather go to bed at 7.30, like if I have a deadline or something, go to bed at 7.30, wake up at like 3 in the morning, then stay up all night. That is the opposite.

Speaker 1:

You just spoke words that a crazy person speaks. You would rather go to bed early and wake up at the witching hour and just stay up and get the job done.

Speaker 2:

Absolutely. My brain is just mush at the end of the day, I don't know how people function. My cognitive abilities are zero.

Speaker 1:

My brain is mush if I wake up at the witching hour.

Speaker 2:

See, this is the thing, this is the classic argument and you know, I probably will never see.

Speaker 1:

This is not classic, this is in the wake. I don't know how to normalize this, Clark.

Speaker 2:

There are morning people, there are night people, and one day maybe I'll get to see this side of the world with you. If I can keep my eyes open for that long, I doubt I will be able to. It could be a sleep. Well, anyways, you never told me how you're doing. Are you doing all right? Tell the people.

Speaker 1:

I got some exciting news, clark. Oh no, you know there's ads we run on this show.

Speaker 2:

So first thing, yeah, have we made some money.

Speaker 1:

I don't know when this episode is going to go out, because we've put out so much content this month that we've hit our limit for how much we can upload.

Speaker 2:

Which is you?

Speaker 1:

know we have 10 minutes left and, looking at the current runtime of this episode, it ain't going up till Thursday All right, let's call it, let's call it out. We actually made enough money in ads over the last three months to pay for. Are you ready? I'm ready, I'm off. A single month of podcasting, whoa.

Speaker 2:

I mean it's a one month to a three. Yeah, that's not bad.

Speaker 1:

It's not bad.

Speaker 2:

We only hold two months out of every three.

Speaker 1:

That's great. Yeah, so you know one. Firstly, this is not. This is not in any way pointing the fingers to our listeners or our listen count or anything like that. This is shaded, like the way these things work. I have to receive an ad, listen to it, then approve it. So if you feel bad for listening to the ad, don't worry, the host has to listen to it too To approve it. So, no, not Clark. Clark is the only one that gets an ad free experience here. So I approve it and then it may or may not show up on the podcast and it may or may not show up in the episode you're listening to. But I get basically like a hundred listens on that ad and they pay me pennies, pennies, clark, for each listen. So we're doing it, we're really getting there.

Speaker 2:

I mean it's not bad. I mean just one month for every three. Eventually we'll get it down to two and then maybe one day we'll break even Well.

Speaker 1:

I don't even know. Just two more years of this and I think we'll do it. I don't even know if we will, because they don't give me more ads to approve. Oh, then they don't show up and then everyone has an ad free experience.

Speaker 2:

Man what a crazy.

Speaker 1:

How do you get more ads? Do you get the?

Speaker 2:

paid, get more ads. It's literally counter-intuitive.

Speaker 1:

I do think it's listener count related, so maybe now it's time to point the fingers. If you're not sharing the pod with your friends and getting our bump and listeners up, then we can get more ads. Share the podcast so we can sully your experience.

Speaker 2:

Let's make this clear, first of all. How dare you? Second of all, start sharing with your friends and family. Force your children to listen to it. We've said this before. So come them on their own devices. Don't do it in the car or something. Tell them all to put their headphones in All separate devices. Start listening to corporatestrategybiz. It'll be good for their hopeless corporate futures and it'll be great for our leasinger ship. Did you say leasinger ship? Leasinger ship? It's getting late. I'm sorry, my brain is shut down. It's 5.56. I ate dinner at like four o'clock. I'm ready to call it an evening.

Speaker 1:

This is high pod energy right here. I'm loving where this is going.

Speaker 2:

Thank, you, clark, you're welcome. Well speaking of where things are going, what's happening in the world. You said I have news and it's awesome.

Speaker 1:

I do have news and it is awesome. I'm trying to stall for as long as I can because I accidentally closed the tab and I swear I'm going to get it back.

Speaker 2:

This is actually well. I want the people to analyze what you're doing. You, Bruce has mastered just filibustering and meetings. When you're trying to like hold time for oh, I lost my point, the pounder point, I lost my notes, whatever it might be you just start kind of like saying things a little slower and talking things in way longer sentences than needs to be, or adding extra words or whatever it might be, and then eventually you find what you're looking for and then you can continue the rhythm like normal. I've been there.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, oh yeah. The filibuster is a skill If you're going to be heavily invested or heavily involved in meetings day in, day out. Highly recommend getting good at saying absolutely nothing. A little bit slower than your normal talking cadence and just being able to wheel and deal out content from your mouth for as long as you can can yield absolutely amazing results. I'm throwing up.

Speaker 2:

I'm throwing up what you're doing. I can't believe you haven't found it yet. This is wild. Oh, I found it.

Speaker 1:

The funny thing is is the news I found that I wanted to share today is kind of tied into what we were just talking about. So this comes from CNBCcom Make it. I don't know what make it is. I guess that's a news division of CNBC. I'm just. I'm just citing my source. That's all Like DIY or like I made it Like.

Speaker 1:

I've never heard of this but, I've heard it in the business feed and I was like this is good, we got to do this news. This comes from Dr Courtney Warren is a contributor at make it CNBC the headline. The headline. Harvard psychologist If you use any of these seven phrases every day, you may have a low emotional intelligence. This isn't my business feed, so I'm going to run through these real quick, clark.

Speaker 2:

I can tell you I probably have said them all because I have zero emotional intelligence. So this would be great. I.

Speaker 1:

Think, I think you may find you have a higher emotional intelligence than you may have. I'm scared. I'm scared what these are gonna be. Number one I'm not changing. This is who I am. And then they, they give a little a rundown here. Emotional therapy Emotional intelligence is associated with an ability to change over time as you learn and grow. People with low emotional intelligence Are often rigid and will fight errors to shift or evolve. Strong convictions are important, but so is being open to new possibilities. And then they, they offer a what to say instead of I'm not changing, this is who I am. Yeah, they do. I need to think about more about what you're saying. I want to be open to feedback about myself, even if it's hard to hear. So this is just you know oh, this is so gross.

Speaker 2:

I hate everything about this.

Speaker 1:

I'm just gonna read around life like that?

Speaker 2:

Like, have you ever met anyone that just says I'm rigid and I'm not willing to change? Has anyone said that to your face?

Speaker 1:

I need to be open to our feedback, more open to hear what you say about myself and even when it's hard to hear no, no, never like that is just not a real-world scenario, like people who are in denial Are gonna.

Speaker 2:

Like they're gonna try to defend their point of view on something they're not gonna tell you I'm rigid like they're not gonna point out the problem because they don't know the problem well.

Speaker 1:

So I think there is. I Would have to go through all 70s because it's like I don't care how you feel, it's your fault. I'm feeling this way. You're just wrong. Stop being crazy. I can't forgive you. Your feelings are irrational.

Speaker 2:

The are these things that, like they say, if you're find yourself saying this or thinking it, these?

Speaker 1:

are just definitely by myself with a low emotional intelligence, say so I don't I don't see people actually saying that.

Speaker 2:

Like I think some of those things in my head and then, you know, the human, rational side of me is like don't say that out loud, that's a dumb idea. So I try to make it much more PC. It's crazy that they think this article is something people actually say.

Speaker 1:

Well, Clark, I don't know what Hives of scum and villainy you frequent, but let me tell you I think I've heard every single one of these, either in a professional or non professional environment, from Different people with low emotional intelligence, according to Dr Courtney Warren. So the thing that I liked about this I don't think it's news, but you know whatever it did it made me think about Restrepo was on last week, our capitalism correspondent, and you know him and I get coffee and him and I often will talk about, like how we try to Put ourselves into the minds of others and be aware and not get stuck in the rut of I am who I am. This is my political identity, my religious identity, my racial identity, whatever, like.

Speaker 1:

There's a thousand different ideas out there and we try to do the best we can to eliminate that and think through all the possibility, like what if I'm wrong? What if I am absolutely 100% dead wrong? I want to know what you think that makes me 100% dead wrong and I want to hear it. I want to do on it, evaluate it, sleep on it and then the next day be like dude, you're out of your freaking mind. But I still want to go through that process and I think that's what this is getting to is a lot of people today aren't willing to even open their minds a little bit to new ideas and possibilities and and this little article is just kind of calling out the statements that get made by those types of people that, hey, if you're saying this, if you catch yourself saying this, perhaps look inward and then you will find an opportunity for growth.

Speaker 2:

I Mean. I guess at the heart of it it makes sense. I Just don't know like if you have that low of An emotional intelligence I don't know that you are Are perceptive enough To be able to realize that you know what I mean. Like people who say things like that are so far down that hole that they're not just gonna like realize it when they say it you know what I mean they're just gonna like attack it from another angle, be like no, you're wrong because of x, y or z, or this person said this or this, whatever religious artifact proves the point of x, y, z. It's like they're always going to be so stuck in the ways. You know this with like older generations. You hear it all the time and Even when you're talking to like certain people grew up in certain areas, you can hear it come out of that. But it's not like they're saying I have low emotional intelligence, it's just they're so stuck on their point because that's like it's just so far ingrained into their being. You know what I mean.

Speaker 2:

I think maybe this article is good, though, because it is kind of making them aware of like right, yeah, maybe I should listen to others and be open-minded.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I think so I wanted. One thing you said is maybe they don't have a low emotional intelligence. You know they're just stuck in their ways, but I see those as one of the same. Yeah, could be. I mean, like, when you think about what is intelligence, is someone born intelligent or they become intelligent?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, nature versus nurture. What do you think I mean for me? I Think you can always become intelligent. I think, human apt I mean, unless obviously there's certain Right, you have a learning impairment or something you know physically or mentally disabling you, but correct for the most part. I think everybody has the same opportunity and then it's up to the experience as opportunities that you.

Speaker 1:

Go after. The only thing stopping us from learning quantum physics is going out there and learning it.

Speaker 2:

I Agree, yeah, if you put enough time and effort towards something, I think you do it.

Speaker 1:

I think that's what they're getting at here. Is that the low emotional intelligence is something that can be overcome. It just takes. It takes the ability to look inward and to really say, like I want to learn quantum physics today. But Instead of quantum physics, it's hearing someone else's point of view.

Speaker 2:

Fair enough. I mean, I think that's great At the core of it. I think it's great yeah.

Speaker 1:

Is it gonna happen?

Speaker 2:

No.

Speaker 1:

Let's move on to our topic today Shall we.

Speaker 2:

You know, I think it actually. I think I mean, I like to be glass-eye full. Yeah, I think you know, and how long I've known you. I think you teeter, sometimes to glass-eye full and sometimes glass-eye empty. I don't like really see you one or the other.

Speaker 1:

I Teeter and I teeter, you do, but they don't fall down.

Speaker 2:

You know, I'm saying you know people's who wobble and they don't fall down. You're right, you're a weeble. I am a weeble wobble. You're a weebling wobble. I very wobble, like the weeble.

Speaker 1:

You know it is Sunday, this is. I didn't work today, so I'm in a different state of mind.

Speaker 2:

that I am true, these things so If you were to psychoanalyze how we are today in this episode, it would probably be much more positive than it is when we do it on a weekday, to say it.

Speaker 1:

I Wish we had the metrics to see how far people make it into the episode and like when we're happy Do they make it further, or we're cynical, you know, like girls ending as gonna take over, lost my jar like does. That would really motivate solicitorship.

Speaker 2:

I don't know, took her jobs, I don't know. Well, I actually think so. I think I generally in glass-eye full, yeah, but I actually would be more interested in listening to something that's glass-eye empty. Is that weird? Mm-hmm, like I don't want to hear the same point of view. I have only hear something different.

Speaker 1:

Well, it's someone who likes to be prepared. I appreciate the half empties, the pessimists of the world, because Right then I mentally prepare for the disappointment that's in store.

Speaker 2:

Fair enough. Well, speaking about the disappointment that's in store, we should jump right into our topic. This was actually a great Well. I don't know if we can call it news, it's honestly. Our. Our segment for news is like news or random article that we found on the internet for this week, which is fine.

Speaker 1:

It's good.

Speaker 2:

Well to the main topic. We're rounding the fourth quarter. We're doing that last lap of 2023. I'm going where this is going and I think it's important for us to Think about and retrospect, you know the year. I don't want to do a retrospective for our podcast We'll do that at the end of the year, like we always do but I want to think about, like In the workplace, what do I want to improve for next year? Mmm, how do I want to improve my image? Was it good, was it bad? Is it too far gone? Like? What are those next things I want to do to either level up my career or be happier with Work, and how I balance work and life? I thought it might be interesting to talk about that and I think this article is actually potentially a really good tip of being able to see other people's points of view. So, if you feel like you're in a rut, so that news even though we never discussed this beforehand ties in really well into this topic.

Speaker 1:

What do you think? Oh, serendipitous is that I know we're on the same wavelength.

Speaker 2:

I love it.

Speaker 1:

Absolutely. We don't. We don't talk, we don't even acknowledge the other's existence for 99% of our lives. Who show up here Gamebleed, just are on it together, love it.

Speaker 2:

It's really like, hey, are you still alive? Yeah, are you still alive? Yeah, all right, get Craig in here, let's do this things.

Speaker 1:

We thinking the same things. Yeah, let's record a podcast.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so I want to talk about like what are, what are those things that that maybe you want to change Bruce of this past year in the workplace, like things you want to improve for next year, different work life balance. I'm really putting you on the spot, but I thought it'd be interesting to talk about some of those things, what other people might be feeling and what maybe you could do differently to overcome them so you know, it's funny.

Speaker 1:

You say that I've been thinking about a little bit about this topic, but it's more about I recently inherited more responsibility in my job and I was already working pretty hard. Let's, let's just. I have not not worked a full eight hour day in Probably like six months, right.

Speaker 1:

So I'm cranking eight hours every day on on the norm. Recently it's been like eight to ten. If I'm being honest, I'm getting a lot of extra work in the day and then my mind is just constantly going and the realization I've had is Because I've inherited more responsibility. For those that are listening, maybe for the first time, or don't know what I do, you know I'm a I'm a director of marketing, but my responsibilities are very broad because I'm going to start up, so I'm also the you know lead evangelist and I have to run demos and I have to ensure that the content we create is good. I have to write that content and I have to get approval for everything. Like. My job is a lot more than what the title Suggests. Right, and that's expanded even more. Now I'm in management and I have a team and I might be inheriting even more people in my team.

Speaker 1:

Oh, I Don't have the ability to focus well, or I should say multitask. Well, I can focus. Great, you give me a single task, I'm gonna sit down, do that task so freaking good, I'm gonna produce the best thing for you. If you give me a single task. The second, you introduce multiple tasks. Chaos, rains and I really need to improve the way I manage my time, my projects, my focus and how I budget for those things. Mentally it's draining and exhausting and I don't know how to handle it, and that would be number one, top of the pyramid. If I'm going to fix one thing, it's whether it's better task management software for me or doing daily mental exercises. I don't know what it is, but I have to improve that or I'm going to go crazy and I'm going to stick at this company until we go public or get acquired. So like I have to figure it out.

Speaker 2:

That is really good. That's a really good one. You guys, I think you mentioned some really key points. You know, for anyone that's inheriting more responsibility or just feel like like every week they just can't get ahead, like they're always behind, something new always comes up and you feel like you're just having to work more to catch up.

Speaker 2:

I think that's a really good thing to focus on and something I actually went through this year that I actually have some tips for, because I definitely felt that last year I even feel a little bit this year, but I didn't plan as well last year and I felt exactly like that. Like every day I'd wake up and go, oh great, I got like 300 emails that I didn't get through yesterday and it's compounding and I hit Friday and I literally would be exhausted, like I can't even look at my email because it's so overwhelming and I've got so many other things going on in my head it's impossible to like really figure out what to do. So I think that's a really good one that I'm sure a lot of people are feeling.

Speaker 1:

Well, are you going to help me? You're going to help me figure it out.

Speaker 2:

I was thinking about it and then I was like you know what? It'd be really funny if I'm just like no, I lie, I'm not telling you any of my tips and the podcast.

Speaker 1:

Oh, no, no.

Speaker 2:

Something I did at the beginning of last year is I really focused on. You know essentially how to organize all the work in your life and I'm a big believer I think I've said it before during this year on the podcast is in the getting things done, the GTD methodology, and to make it really simple, if you can do something and underneath two minutes, just do it. If you can't put it in a place, you can trust in the right category and in a system that will remind you at the right time. So you know, you put it somewhere. You say, okay, a catalog, that piece of work, it's in this intake box, it's in this place and it's going to remind me at this time that I've got to take care of this thing. So that way you get it out of your head and you get it into a place and then over time you basically refine your system and for me I use the combination of I use a project management system, I pay for it personally called Monday. So I use Monday to basically organize everything from my personal life to my work life, but like all the way down to oh, I've got to do taxes this month or we're planning a trip. What are the things I need to do to plan the trip.

Speaker 2:

And everything inside of that system is actionable. So it's not just like I'd eat on the earth. It's not like, you know, go do this massive project. It's like break down every single step of what that project is. You know, let's say, if I'm planning a trip or whatever, it's like, okay, find the dates that work well, coordinate with my wife, you know, find the next step would be, you know, find flights that actually work within our budget on the airline that we want.

Speaker 2:

And then, kind of from there you can break down each and every step and I look at everything as work, quote, unquote. So everything goes into this system so that I know where it is, what to do with it. And every single week I do a weekly review and with myself I just take like an hour and a half and I basically go through everything. I'm like, okay, what are my upcoming projects? Is everything broken down in a good spot? Is everything at inbox zero? So my email is empty. Everything's in the system and it's helped me tremendously, bruce. I can tell you like every week I feel so much better about where things are at and I think this year was one of the most productive years I've had being a corporate employee Wow.

Speaker 1:

I mean, I'm looking at it right now and, firstly, we're not sponsored by this company. If they want to, I'll take the sponsorship and I'll try out your application, so I don't have to pay for one more thing. But the I mean it's very colorful and just kind of looking at how they do this, it seems nice. It seems like this can help. I've been trying to use Trello to this extent, but I think my failing and you said it right in the beginning is to get anything done. Model, which you have mentioned before.

Speaker 1:

I just forgot, and I think the piece that I'm missing that you eloquently stated, is every task that takes over two minutes goes in there, and those are the things that get me. Is someone says, hey, can you send me the latest deck? It's like, yeah, no problem, I'll send that to you right now. But if someone says like, oh, can you go write a quick little 600 word blog, like I'll start the word pad, I'll start typing, and then I got to do something else that's more important and the blog stays, you know, a quarter written for weeks. And then they're like, hey, what about that blog? It's like dang, I could have just knocked that out had I actually budgeted the task, so this is perfect. Actually, I think that getting things done model I'm going to commit right now to our listeners and to you, clark, that I'm going to use the getting things done, getting things done, getting things done model GTD and I will see how it works. I might look at Monday as well, but I'm telling you read the book.

Speaker 2:

It's great, you know. It kind of breaks things down for you and it's meant to be iterative, like you should read a piece, do the thing, then step to the next piece and so on, so you can read it, you know, quickly and do all the things later. Or you can read it stop, do something for like three or four weeks, come back to the book, pick up from there, and it's really good because it kind of helps you find great in your system. Because, like you, I was using Trello and I found I outgrew it.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it just wouldn't allow me to future plan, like if I had to put a project in, I'm like OK, well, trello is just, you know, a con bond task management. How do I put a project in the first couple of steps I need to do, when scheduled them on a calendar, and it just made it really hard to kind of plan everything in my life and essentially when I moved to Monday. Sure, it costs money every single month that I pay out of my pocket, but everything goes in there Like it's got a browser app, it's got a desktop app for Mac and Windows, it's got a phone app, it's got an iPad app. So, no matter where I am when I'm on, if something comes up, like if we're talking about the podcast and I have to go do something, I immediately pull up my phone, I put it in there underneath the podcast topic and I schedule a day that I'm going to do it and I think something that oh go ahead please.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, no, let me ask you real quick how much does Monday cost?

Speaker 2:

Actually, I'm not quite sure, I think it's like 45 a month 45 a month, I know. I know it sounds crazy. Maybe you had a pocket for this?

Speaker 1:

I do, but I literally use it for everything that's like paying for a podcast out of pocket.

Speaker 2:

I know, right. Well, that's why I told you. Well, they still think people do that. Only idiots would ever do that. But I'm telling you. I'm telling you, I use it all the time for everything and I found it to use it in a way that works really well for me and it's worth every penny. Like I am so happy I have it because it just makes my life a lot easier to manage. I mean, let's be honest, life is hard, like managing your regular life plus work, plus family life, plus just being like a human, and like having to pay bills and do stuff, and it all adds up and the more stuff you get, the more people you know, the more you have to do, and if you don't have a place to put all that stuff, it's just sitting in your brain. I don't know about you. I can barely even answer my text messages, so I need a place for all that stuff to go.

Speaker 1:

I mean I'm looking at the pricing here for an individual. I mean it doesn't see it's like $16 a month for the pro Is using are you using enterprise?

Speaker 2:

I might be using something crazy, maybe I'm, maybe I'm mixing two things, I don't know. But either way, $16 is much better than what I was.

Speaker 1:

Yeah the basic is eight. I mean up to free is two seats. I might. I might just try free, I might see how I can get on free and then I'll report back, but that's my commitment. So I like also you know, I'm looking at this, getting things done book and listen, clark, this sounds like a great book. It sounds like a fantastic model. But I know exactly what you're going to say, dude, if you're going to do a book like the cover.

Speaker 2:

the cover is so bad, it doesn't matter.

Speaker 1:

I encourage all of our listeners to quickly go Google the cover to getting things done where David Allen is just standing in the right third like the creepiest oldest whitest dude you've ever seen?

Speaker 2:

You look at this and literally just toss it aside and be like OK Boomer. You will literally do that, but I'm telling you he is very relatable. Stuff is great and I think it stands the test of time. You know what?

Speaker 1:

I do this is. This is just pure marketing genius that I'm going to rain on David Allen right now, if you listen to David Allen.

Speaker 2:

I hope you're listening.

Speaker 1:

You have a great upper thirds. Just take it, make the whole front cover blue Getting things. Two words big, bold text center of the page bold, white Helvetica. I think that's good Done. Big black letters, check mark in the O, oh, hot, and David Allen, and white in the bottom bold. No images, just words Helvetica. Trust me, it's a better cover?

Speaker 2:

I agree, I don't think you should. I think putting your face on it is a tough move.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, he's smiling too, like he knows something you don't know. You know.

Speaker 2:

Exactly. I'm not good with that. People trust people nowadays, so I agree, you've got to be careful throwing your face out there. That's why I have not revealed my identity. For all those reasons, one thing let me tell you a game changer, though Anybody can actually like put something in a system, put it in a place, but the same thing is going to happen. It's just going to be another system for you to manage, right? So the thing I challenge you to do is you've got to commit to doing the weekly planning and the weekly review. Yeah, it's going to be on your own time. Yeah, it's going to be an hour at the beginning of the week, hour after Game changer, and what I will say is something that like kind of blew my mind when I was reading this is he kind of talks through putting things in context of where you are and what you're doing.

Speaker 2:

So, for example, if you know you have to make five phone calls, because either it's really old companies who only work by phone call or you need to call grandma or whatever it is, you put your to-dos together, you group them underneath context that you can do those things. So, for example, you can have a while driving section, move all those things to while driving and every single phone call. Every time you hop in the car, you pull up while driving, you're like, okay, great, I'm going to make these six calls. And so I'm telling you that context, like while I'm sitting on the couch at night you know whatever it might be while I'm going for a walk in the morning. It's kind of a really good way for you to like build that routine in your life and that will essentially make your whole system be trustworthy. Everything goes out of your head helps you relax because you know it's in a trusted place and it's going to tell you when you need to do those things, or you know when you're going to be checking in on it.

Speaker 1:

Really optimize the grouping. I like that a lot and I'm already thinking of ways I can do that. So thank you, I appreciate that that's my goal. I'm going to do it.

Speaker 2:

I love it. I'm sorry, I didn't mean to send this whole thing just on one topic, but I think you brought up a perfect one that I had tips for, so work that.

Speaker 1:

Yes, that's great. I mean. Well, tell me yours. What are you going to do?

Speaker 2:

You know, I've got a few things on my mind as I've kind of reflected through this year. One thing that I'm really proud of is I think I've, like I've hired my whole team. I've got like 10 people on my team now and my team is kicking butt Like I'm so happy with everyone I've hired. They've taken so much off my plate and as I learn, they just continually get better and it feels like my load is lightning, which is good, and I can focus on like more longer term strategy.

Speaker 2:

I think what I want to change is kind of my, my perception to the more senior people in my company. Like I'm usually like a feel good kind of guy. You know I always kind of like crack a joke here and there, but some of my culture can be a little strict and they want to be more, a little more real. So I want to make sure that I'm not just like talking to talk. I want to like spend the time to be like okay, I don't need to talk or respond to everything. I can just like sit there and take in what they're saying and only chime in when it's really going to make a difference. I don't need to just chime in to chime in to like get my voice out there.

Speaker 2:

So I kind of want to be more calm and collected and trust that my work and my team's work is going to speak for itself and to get things done. Or people need something done, they know. Go to Clark's team. He's going to, he's going to get it done and even if he doesn't say anything in this meeting, we're going to ask him like what do you think about this? Was this a good plan? So that way it's not just like always having to feel like I need to speak or respond to everything or show up to everything, even you know it's funny, clark, what's that?

Speaker 1:

You and I are like polar opposites, are we? I feel like you have mastered the challenge I have and I live by the challenge you have. So the advice, the advice I can give you is everyone hates being in meetings.

Speaker 1:

And there's actually two things you said. I want to digest the second one. First, everyone hates being in meetings and, secretly, everyone's thinking can we not have everyone chime in and say every little piece, let's just get what we need to get out of here and get it done. And I think there is an awareness I think I hope I pray I've gotten as far as I have and I truly believe in this that if you don't have something to contribute or add, it doesn't need to be said. You never need to inform willingly. I think it's. It's much more of a if someone asks a question and you have the answer, be there to answer it, especially if you're the right one to answer it Right.

Speaker 2:

But if that's something I struggle with, yeah, be honest with the guys like right, I feel like that's a place where who is the right person to answer this? Even if I know the answer, like should I not answer it because it should be someone else?

Speaker 1:

Can I give you a little sales tip this?

Speaker 2:

is a sales tip.

Speaker 1:

I learned this from my sales enablement trainer back when I first joined as an SE. When someone talks and they're having a meeting and they pause, you wait five seconds because you never know when they're going to come back in and say more things that you can gather. And when someone asks a question and it could be to anybody If there's someone more qualified than you to answer it, it might take them five seconds to get the courage to go out there and say it. So brains are slow.

Speaker 1:

I know you and me we run a podcast. Our brains are operating at like five gigahertz overclock. We need water cooling or we're going to die. But a lot of people take time and think about what they say before they say it. So you give them that few second break. No one's going to be upset and that's that's the kind of crazy thing is a little bit of silence goes a long way on a meeting and it does give those who are more like right to answer the question the opportunity to get their mind going and put the answer out there. Right.

Speaker 2:

That's a great tip. I love it. I think it's it's something of like the culture of you get recognized by speaking up and also you just want them being to be over. So you just want to chime in and like, give the answer. So you get like OK, let's move on. Let's get to the next topic, let's get down with this. But to your point, I think that's not an effective way to scale Like. I think you'll really hit bottlenecks if you're the one answering for everything, everyone will just look to you and in an enterprise or giant corporate situation, you can't be the only person who knows the answer to something or play all the parts, because that just doesn't scale. You're only one person.

Speaker 1:

Well, and I don't want to make this therapy for you, clark, but you know I pay attention to a lot of things you say and do and I'm very critical of how many meetings you go to and how much of your time is monopolized by meetings.

Speaker 1:

And I'm starting to think you might be doing this to yourself. If you show up and you dominate and you have the answers and you're just Mr, mr Know it all. They're going to invite you to everything because they don't know who else they need to bring in or talk to you or who else can fill in for you. They can answer these questions and now I'm starting to wonder could you get some time back? I do want to go ahead.

Speaker 2:

No, no, I just was going to say it's true and I think that's like. I think, honestly, that's one of the biggest career shifts I had of like I've got to be in everything, I've got to answer everything, because that's how you get recognized to truly. It's about the work and output you do and your team does, and you don't need to be that person and everything and it's OK if you decline things or don't show up or tell people hey, I'm not planning to join this meeting because I feel like we can cover an email, like that's OK, but it's something I definitely need to do more of and rely on my team and protect my team from doing what I did previously.

Speaker 1:

There was a meeting I was on at a job I had and it drove me nuts. It was an executive meeting. It was like everyone has to go if you're important to the executive meeting. And I actually begged my boss. I was like can I please not go to this? It's just a giant waste of time. I stopped going. My productivity skyrocketed, I got more money. They promoted me. Like listen, just being seen by these people, I was going to say something else is not anything. Everyone shows up and talks and rolls the eyes at the back of the skull. Those that go and do they actually do get noticed, because they realize you're the one who's doing the thing. So that's just a practical lived experience. I begged to get out of that meeting. I was like I don't need to be there, you're already there. We already have representation from marketing. Please just go. Please remove me. I can't do this for hours every week. And I got out and look at me now.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it's true, I'm staying down by the river With all the cool kids who are getting paid all the money. Yeah, no, but it's true, that's what you get stuck into, I think when you're a little peon, like you're not up the corporate ladder, like you see these big meetings, you're like, oh, I just got invited to this meeting. This is a huge moment for me, like it's so important. At the end of the day, all those senior leaders want is to see good work be done the right way. Yep, you know, and like it's that simple. So as if you stick your head down and you do your work and you chime in when you're truly the right person with the right context, with the right answer, you will be recognized for it and your contribution won't be missed.

Speaker 1:

You will get your time in the sun, like you would promise you. There will be a moment where they say, hey, we need Clark to set up a meeting so he can show us what his team's been doing for the last six months, and in that meeting, that is your time to own the stage. Right, but when it's not your time, it's not your time, exactly. I do want to go back to something else. You said yeah, please, because I am your licensed therapist.

Speaker 2:

Thank you, I don't pay you for this, but just just reminder.

Speaker 1:

What do I get paid for on this podcast? The? You made a comment that said I don't want to be his chummy. Do you remember what you said? That he said?

Speaker 2:

I don't want to be his chummy. Well, it's not as chummy, I think. I don't know what's the right way to put this. Elaborate on that, please, yeah, yeah, yeah, not as chummy. I think I'm always friendly, yeah, but I don't want to be seen as that guy that always like chit chats in the hall and always like pops in with a joke or whatever it is Like. I think it just and maybe I mean you and I look at this very different. So I'm excited for what you're going to say, but I think there's an element of like focus and directness that you need to do when you're in a large organization managing a lot of work. Otherwise you kind of get sucked into everybody wanting to talk to the water cooler about everything you know.

Speaker 2:

So I think, there's a balance that you have to find, so like it's not not being chummy and being friendly. Of course you're always going to be cordial and you know you do generally need to care for people, but I think there is a balance so that way you're not always the guy getting pinged from everybody because you're the nice, friendly guy in the office, Because you actually need to focus and get your work done.

Speaker 1:

So that the context helps. And I also forget that you work in a physical place where physical people live and exist Hybrid, yes, yeah, yeah. The remote example, you know, when you joined a meeting a few minutes early and your other coworkers are there and you're talking about how you watch the game this weekend and they scored so many goal units, the that's your time to be chummy, right, truly. That is like the best time to network and cut it up and be yourself and show the best part of who you are as a human, not as an employee. Don't talk about work in that early before the meeting started part of the meeting, but I get it.

Speaker 1:

So this, and now that you give me the context, I get it. And in physical space, being chummy is a death sentence. I've lived that and I hate it. That's part of the reason why I don't want to ever go back to the office is there is some people just like to talk to the people they like to talk to, and when they corner you and you're just the guy to go to, you can't get work done because you're being chummy.

Speaker 2:

Everyone comes by your office, everyone comes by your cubicle. They want to talk about X, y or Z and at the end of the day you're like, oh shoot, I was in the middle of this email. And then you get pulled into this conversation. And then you go back and you're like what was I talking about again? What goes in this email? And there's a cost to every one of those distractions when you're trying to get work done.

Speaker 1:

I know I do have a solution for you, for here as well. Ooh, I'm excited, easy fix, easy fix. This one is actually a physical thing you have to buy. So what I recommend is a very visible pair of headphones, maybe AirPods Maxes if you will. The trick is you just keep them on your head when you're around other people and when they wave at you, make eye contact, look, give them the old and I'm pantomiming, but you can't see. Put your left hand in the air, raise your eyebrows. Wave, but keep your mouth closed. Point to your headphones and then do the I'm on a call, but mouth it and make your hand do the hang 10 gesture. Wiggle it back and forth a wee bit. Perfect. Saves you from a little fuddley confrontation that's gonna get in your way and stop you from being productive If you're at your desk and they swing by. Same thing Call, sorry. It solves every problem.

Speaker 2:

Whisper it really loud. Yeah, that totally does.

Speaker 1:

it's smart, I like it, you'll never have an issue being chummy again. Yeah, exactly, at least I'm used to what I'm like. At least I'm used to what I'm like I use calls all day.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, right man, is he ever off calls? He's so busy.

Speaker 1:

And then you have the appearance of importance.

Speaker 2:

You look so he's on call all day Right, and you know the hard thing to balance too, because I've had multiple people tell me this year.

Speaker 2:

They're like you're so busy, Like thanks for taking the time to come to this meeting, and I'm like, is that good though?

Speaker 2:

Like just being busy to be busy like, or just being pulled in all these stupid meetings. It doesn't mean I'm important, but it seems to be the corporate, the corporate misinterpretation, if you will, of like if you're in a bunch of meetings you must be important, but in reality it's like you're probably just wasting a bunch of time and not actually doing focused work. So when people tell me that I have like mixed feelings, like I appreciate that because it feels like I have some semblance of importance, but I also I don't like that because I shouldn't be in meetings all the time. I should either be trusting my team to be in those meetings or I should be focused on doing focused work and there's no need to have all those meetings, cause at the end of the day, all about the work and the outcomes and how you move the business forward. So I cringe at those comments and I get I've been getting them a lot lately which I don't like.

Speaker 1:

Can I tell you, the most passive it's not even passive aggressive, it's just straight up aggressive thing that I do when people say that I'm excited.

Speaker 2:

I'll get it.

Speaker 1:

I'll legit get the. I know you're really busy and I'll be like and yet you came to ask me for more work anyways.

Speaker 2:

Okay, don't be like Bruce, so little agrees.

Speaker 1:

I've said that way more than 10 times. So I'm still employed. I'm still employed, yeah, you're right.

Speaker 2:

You're right, actually you have a lot of my play what did you want? And then they talk to you about it and you're like, oh, but you said I'm really busy, so is this more important than the other things I have to do?

Speaker 1:

I've legit said these exact words to numerous people and the best part is is they still give me the work and they're like it's just no one else can do it and I'm like is that a problem? Do you think that might be a problem with our organization, that no one else can do it?

Speaker 1:

I'm gonna get to a place and then I don't get out of it. So you know, I know what, though it's never hurt me that I know of this is the glass that full, like you're okay being chummy and you're always friendly to everyone.

Speaker 2:

But then the second someone tries to slap more work on your plate. That's not more important. You give them the hammer.

Speaker 1:

Oh, so you hate my guts? Is that what you're saying? You hate me cool. Good to know that. I thought we were friends, but apparently you just want me to be miserable all day. Thank you for more work, I appreciate it.

Speaker 2:

I'm just so busy doing everything, you just stack another thing on my plate, why not? I really appreciate that.

Speaker 1:

Great right. Like people love, that People really love when you just, you know, butthole them with words.

Speaker 2:

I mean to be fair. You probably would catch them off guard and be like did he just say that you know what's?

Speaker 1:

funny is? I don't think I do. I think everyone knows who I am so well from a personality perspective that it doesn't even phase them. They're just like yeah, it sucks to be you, but you got to do it anyway. I'm like dang it. They've all adopted my culture. Now. This is not good.

Speaker 2:

See, now you do it too much. You got to be pickier. You got to be pickier of when you pull that card.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I guess you could over rotate on it and then everyone just does it, oh.

Speaker 2:

I love that you know what I'm never going to say to anybody, I'm never going to walk.

Speaker 1:

Be like I know you're so busy. It's like no, just work, I'm plate go do it.

Speaker 2:

See, that's the thing. I've never said that to anybody. No, absolutely not. We got to do work and obviously I need you for something. So I'm going to come ask you and you can tell me I'll go shove it, but generally you don't, so I'm going to assume you can make time for it.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I'm going to faint ignorance. I'm going to pretend you're not busy at all. I'm going to pretend like you haven't been doing nothing. It's like I know you've kind of just been hanging out here waiting for something to come your way. But guess what? I got great news it's finally arrived.

Speaker 2:

I know you've been twirling your thumbs, doing absolutely nothing, attending these stupid meetings. How about I add one more thing to your plate so you can be more miserable?

Speaker 1:

Just in case. Just in case our listeners are new and they're not aware of when the sarcasm meter goes off the charts. Just ignore the last 15 minutes of advice.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I don't know how we got into this endless rattle back and forth about just like complete negativity in the workplace. Don't be like us, don't do this.

Speaker 1:

It's going to happen to everyone. You're going to get there, and that's the sad thing. I don't think there's any corporate company on planet Earth that doesn't eventually grind you to the point where you just you become the guy from office space, where you just don't care and you'll say whatever you think. I never thought it would happen to me and here I am.

Speaker 2:

It's the stages of work depression. That's another episode we need to do. It is.

Speaker 1:

It absolutely. That's not even a joke, that's a real thing.

Speaker 2:

It is an absolute real thing, you become callous in corporations.

Speaker 1:

That's the thing about like working in a company since 20s, 12, dude, dude. I've been working in the corporation since 20 frickin 12. Disgusting, it's awful, it is disgusting. I'm this jaded already. I've got 20 more years of this, maybe, at minimum. Maybe I mean, why am I get lucky?

Speaker 2:

That's true lucky always factor in the luck. You could be okay. Oh Well, that was a good check. I think we both ended with some really good stuff at that, and I'm proud.

Speaker 2:

I'm happy about it, I hope everyone takes the time this see, I don't really believe in New Year's resolutions because, like you, should just Consistently build things in your routine of life. So, yeah, I'm done same, but I think it's a this time of year, since you're ending the year, is a good time to reflect and think about what you want to do different To make your life better. And so that's why I want to bring up this topic, because we're getting that time of the year again when it's time to think about those things, almost time for our annual retrospective, which I'm sure will be in an upcoming episode where we'll talk about how we want to be better. So I think it's a good time you're to bring it up.

Speaker 1:

I Completely agree and I am gonna absolutely take your advice and I'll let you know how it goes in a couple months.

Speaker 2:

I'm excited. I'll hold you to it. Hold me. I'm putting it in my waiting for category. I'm putting a date on it right now and my great and I'll talk to you on March 15th.

Speaker 1:

Excellent, I'll be there or I'll be dead. But you won't know that unless you know you. You subscribe to our podcast, but before you do that, before you do that and you check out all the cool things we're gonna talk about, there is one last thing we have to do. That's right. It's everyone's favorite game show. It's called what do you mean? I see nothing here. There's, there's, there's something. Okay, there's a little something, and I think you're up this time. I am up this time, it's too easy.

Speaker 1:

No, no no, I think it's fair. I mean, it's my turn.

Speaker 1:

So, I'm gonna do it. So for those, I like my view the first time. What do you mean? There's a recurring show we do where, if you join our discord you'll find out how to do that in a minute you can post in the what do you mean?

Speaker 1:

Channel a meme that summarizes the previous episode, and Clark and I have to describe that meme with words, because podcasts are audio only. So this meme actually comes from our previous guest, alex Risrepo, capitalist correspondent, who posted a picture of a man, an older man, some might you know. He kind of looks like a Eugene to me, if I had to get a totally nice, totally does a little salt and pepper on the hair. Behind him, a blackboard in front of him bespeckled his face, very large glasses reflecting lights in his eyes, but behind those glasses are the eyes of a Solace man whose light has left his personality decades ago. True, he looks longingly off the camera, away from the meme format, and just utters the words Clark, clark. And I think the reason why Risrepo posted this is because, deep down, all of us wonder is Clark going to show up to the next podcast? And in our hearts, while we're hearing the intro, we we hear welcome back to corporate strategy podcast could be an email. I'm Bruce and everyone's just waiting for Clark. Clark, I think that's it.

Speaker 2:

They're well done. I'm giving you the golf clap and two fingers in the palm. Thank you, golf clap. It was really good. I loved it. I lived every moment of that. Emotion really goes there and one day, when you don't hear I'm Bruce and I'm, and I don't show up, just know I'll be out there, probably driving a car through a whole entire wall of glass and Having a great, great day off of school.

Speaker 1:

Well, there'd be music in the background, going bomb bomb.

Speaker 2:

Oh 100%.

Speaker 1:

Oh, excellent, awesome.

Speaker 2:

Okay. Okay, this one wasn't bad. You did an awesome job. I just I'm gonna get some gnarly memes next time, and I know it. So, yeah, I want to play. Go in there, actually, you know. You know, let's restart if you want to play, join our discord. Our discord is full of bunch of cool people. Learn you know about jobs, about news, about tech events and, more importantly, you can not only submit a topic, but you can submit a meme and we have to describe it Through our voices and through our brain and try to articulate what it's saying, and you won't even know what it looks like If you're listening to this and you're not in the discord.

Speaker 1:

So get in the discord and go see it, that's that's absolutely true, clark, and I also just realized when you're in that discord, you're gonna look at that meme and you realize I said Eugene, it's been, it's been. How could I mess that up? Anyway, if you want to hear the other ways that we engage with our community and the other content we put out there there's so many places if you want to stay up on all things corporate strategy, make sure to sign up for our newsletter. That's right, arc made a newsletter and if you're not following it, how are you knowing? The latest episode drops in your inbox. True, you can also follow us on LinkedIn, instagram, youtube.

Speaker 1:

X formerly known as Twitter. As NPR often says, and Maybe one day will be elsewhere as well, we do have a video on YouTube now, so check that out. It's us with emoji heads and oh, like I said before, if, if you like what you hear, if you made it this far, why don't you give us a little bit of a review? You know? Like, please, let the people know what you think about us.

Speaker 2:

Oh, Is that everything? Do we have it?

Speaker 1:

No, you didn't. We actually swapped the order here, but I wanted to know if you're gonna do the ads bit.

Speaker 2:

But you're not well, yeah, I mean we already kind of talked to as we can, we? So I mean, yeah, there might be ads. I mean I think we might have hit our limit of ads, but hey, we actually paid for a month of podcasting. It's right in the year of 2023. Wow, hey, 11 more of those and I think we are smooth sailing. You are no longer going in debt every single time we post these episodes.

Speaker 2:

But I think, if you want to share anything, you know, if you want to give us a little money for what we do, because we, you know, ultimately make nothing, we are negative business. It's bad. Our accountant looks at us and they're like what are you doing?

Speaker 1:

You're losing money business. It sucks.

Speaker 2:

This is you, you're talking to no one into the ether, like there's no way people listen to this garbage. But hey, you know what? If you want to help us actually not have to have ads on any of these, you can just contribute a small amount. Hit the link to the notes. Yeah, super easy, you know, I think it's like a couple dollars a month. Or you can do one-time gift. So join that I've given some money and then ads will go away magically. I think. If just a few of you do it, I think we'll be rid of them for real forever.

Speaker 1:

You know what I'm gonna throw something else out there. It's not in the notes. If you know of a sponsor, that kind of gels, what we do like, let's say, monday. Well, you work at Monday and you're like, hey, I was in this podcast. These chuckle heads actually endorsed you guys for free. We're happy to take on sponsors that make sense to the pot as well, so just open line out there. And I also just want to say you know, as you listen, if you think that this podcast can help someone share it with them, the way we grow is completely organically through word of mouth. We're not active on the socials like we should be because we have full-time jobs, so we do. All of our listeners have found us either through friendship and sharing or just natural SEO. So sharing the pod actually goes a long way and we appreciate when you do that.

Speaker 2:

We do we do.

Speaker 1:

I think that's it. That's definitely it. And Just one more time, thank you for listening and remember to ten extra output. I'm Bruce and I'm clerk and you're on mute. We'll touch base with you next week. Boom, boom, chica.

Speaker 2:

Da na na na Boom Boom. Oh yeah, oh yeah, oh.

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