Corporate Strategy

123. Be Productive with AI

July 01, 2024 The Corporate Strategy Group Season 4 Episode 17
123. Be Productive with AI
Corporate Strategy
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Corporate Strategy
123. Be Productive with AI
Jul 01, 2024 Season 4 Episode 17
The Corporate Strategy Group

What's it like to record a podcast with an evil twin? Meet Giarc, the mischievous counterpart to our trusty assistant Craig, who turns our studio dynamics upside down with his unpredictable antics. From Clark's upcoming vacation to our hilarious critique of workplace procrastination, this episode is a rollercoaster of personal updates and chaotic energy. We even tackle the frustrating reality of colleagues who just can't seem to respond to emails on time, all while keeping the laughs coming.

Is AI taking over our jobs or just changing the game? Join us for a spirited round of "Real News or Fake News," where we explore the shifting employment landscape amidst massive layoffs and the rise of AI. Despite the doom and gloom, we highlight the surprising resilience of the workforce, with many juggling multiple roles. We also dive into the irony of AI's greater influence on creative industries rather than practical ones, celebrating the adaptability of today's workers who manage to thrive despite the odds.

Ever felt like an imposter at work? We've got you covered! Discover how AI tools like Microsoft Copilot and ChatGPT can boost productivity and ease the pressure of imposter syndrome, especially for software engineers. Hear about the practical benefits and amusing pitfalls of using AI for tasks ranging from generating podcast show notes to automating coding chores. As we ponder the future of AI, we invite you to share your own experiences and insights, painting a picture of a future where AI is not just a tool, but a transformative force in our daily lives.

Everything Corporate Strategy:
All the links!

Elevator Music by Julian Avila
Promoted by MrSnooze

Don't forget ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ it helps!

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

What's it like to record a podcast with an evil twin? Meet Giarc, the mischievous counterpart to our trusty assistant Craig, who turns our studio dynamics upside down with his unpredictable antics. From Clark's upcoming vacation to our hilarious critique of workplace procrastination, this episode is a rollercoaster of personal updates and chaotic energy. We even tackle the frustrating reality of colleagues who just can't seem to respond to emails on time, all while keeping the laughs coming.

Is AI taking over our jobs or just changing the game? Join us for a spirited round of "Real News or Fake News," where we explore the shifting employment landscape amidst massive layoffs and the rise of AI. Despite the doom and gloom, we highlight the surprising resilience of the workforce, with many juggling multiple roles. We also dive into the irony of AI's greater influence on creative industries rather than practical ones, celebrating the adaptability of today's workers who manage to thrive despite the odds.

Ever felt like an imposter at work? We've got you covered! Discover how AI tools like Microsoft Copilot and ChatGPT can boost productivity and ease the pressure of imposter syndrome, especially for software engineers. Hear about the practical benefits and amusing pitfalls of using AI for tasks ranging from generating podcast show notes to automating coding chores. As we ponder the future of AI, we invite you to share your own experiences and insights, painting a picture of a future where AI is not just a tool, but a transformative force in our daily lives.

Everything Corporate Strategy:
All the links!

Elevator Music by Julian Avila
Promoted by MrSnooze

Don't forget ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ it helps!

Speaker 1:

oh my, no, you did not. No, you did not. That's not Craig. It is a relative of Craig. A new player has entered the room.

Speaker 2:

I love how angry Jark looks. He just looks so pissed off. Jark's got angry eyebrows where Craig doesn't have any eyebrows at all. Like J'Arc is smiling maliciously, craig is just stone-faced. Like Craig is just like. I'm just here to do my job. J'arc's like I'm going to enjoy the job I'm about to do.

Speaker 1:

Is there any? Why is he here? Is there any background to this?

Speaker 2:

Well, Craig couldn't make it oh my gosh.

Speaker 1:

I don't know if I like this.

Speaker 2:

I got a warning that said the application did not respond, from Craig, so I'm guessing Craig is a little overloaded right now, so we had to call him G-Ark.

Speaker 1:

G-Ark killed him. He's dead. Craig is dead.

Speaker 2:

We haven't even started the pod but, like just in case, this is your first episode you've ever listened to and you're like what the heck are these people talking about? You gotta join our discord. We record all of our stuff in a recording channel in the discord and those who are in know craig is the friendly little bear that shows up and records all of our podcasts. Occasionally craig just doesn't show up to work and doesn't give us notice, so we have to call in his evil twin, jark, to fill in. And you got to see these icons.

Speaker 1:

It's just so good, it's so good, it is so wild. It's almost like Jark is the IT representative who's on call 24-7. And he just gets called and he's just pissed and he's like I'm going to wreak some havoc today Because he's smiling.

Speaker 2:

So and he's just pissed and he's like I'm gonna wreak some havoc today because like he's smiling, so like he's happy with himself, but he's got the eyebrows like I'm gonna do some harm. Giark has drank an entire pot of free coffee and has scrolled all of reddit.

Speaker 1:

There's no more reddit to scroll and that's what that color like yeah, I know, behind him, like it's just so menacing.

Speaker 2:

It's very malicious looking. Oh boy, I don't trust the quality of this recording. You know, g-arc, that I know you're here, but boy, you gotta change that attitude. Gotta change that attitude. You're not gonna last in corporate strategy, brother. No, not with that, not with him.

Speaker 1:

Angry eyebrows well, this is gonna be interesting. We haven't done one. Have we ever done one with g-arc? Or do we just have to bring them in like?

Speaker 2:

or we attempted to at one point. We attempted to and it didn't work, but it looks like it's working right now, which tells me the craigslist servers are overloaded, so we're gonna give this a shot. This is gonna be a wild ride, guys. No promises y'all. Welcome back to corporate strategy podcast. It could have been an email. I'm Bruce. We're very afraid of what GR is going to do in here. But outside of that vibe, check, clark, how you doing.

Speaker 1:

Vibe check. It's a good day. It's a good day, bruce, besides GR being here. It's a good day because tomorrow I start vacation.

Speaker 1:

Yes, I love that I was at a point. I'll be honest, I haven't finished everything I need to do today, so that's hanging over my head a little bit. But it just feels so good knowing tomorrow it starts and I'm free and you're taking how many weeks? I'm taking two full weeks off, I guess, plus a day, so 11 business days. Well, I guess there's a holiday in between so you can knock that off, but either way, 11 business days away from the office and I am pumped.

Speaker 2:

I am a little bit jealous and hate you right now. Just a little bit, be just all you want.

Speaker 1:

I've earned this, I've put in my time, I'm ready to go and I hope everyone's jealous because I'm leaving them with a shit storm to deal with it's.

Speaker 2:

it's times like these. I'm glad we don't record in the studio, because I would reach across the table and strangle you right now. Just I'm going to choke you out. Deal, You're out of office. I would steal it from you and take it for myself.

Speaker 1:

You know what the best feeling is, what? What is that? When you set that out of office message and you go and you're just like, oh, I'm not making me look at this for a good two weeks.

Speaker 2:

Oh, it's so good. It's a good feeling. It's especially good when you know there are people who had an opportunity to talk with you and get what they need from you before you're out. But they they, you know, don't listen and chose not to, and you know they're going to hit you're out of office. You just know it's going to bounce to them and they're going to be like, well dang, I really needed this, clark. I really needed it, but I didn't have the wherewithal to actually talk to you when you were working. I can only do things on my time because I'm a lazy sack of turds. I on my time because I'm a lazy sack of turds.

Speaker 1:

I've gotten a couple messages already like hey you know, could I talk to you real quick before you leave? I didn't get them. The time of day Didn't even respond. Good, Isn't that terrible? I'm just like no, it's not terrible. I was planning to head out just a few minutes ago. I got a couple things individually I want to do. I'm not getting caught up in something that's not expected unexpected.

Speaker 2:

No, nobody got the time for that. No, it's pathetic that, like I hate to say that, I hate to say this, yeah, but that kind of behavior right there, the selfish, I don't care about you until the last possible minute before you leave, like those are the people that are the reason why this podcast exists in the first place, like if they, if those people didn't exist, we wouldn't do this show because the world would be a better place. Yeah, absolutely.

Speaker 1:

But yeah, it's going to be great. You've got the whole two weeks to look forward to. That'll be off, fingers crossed. Nothing major is going to go on. I actually am a little happy that there's a holiday in the middle, because I think it's going to be a lighter week. A lot of people will be off summertime, so I don't think anything crazy is going to happen. I think it's gonna be nice and quiet and I'm gonna be able to join my vacation. I'm going across the pond, yep, going to the UK, going to London, so I'll be there for a few weeks. It's gonna be wonderful.

Speaker 2:

Really looking forward to it. I'm very excited to hear your tales of the European seas, although you're just hitting one country and technically it's not part of the EU anymore. So, yeah, what.

Speaker 1:

I'm really worried about though.

Speaker 2:

What is it?

Speaker 1:

I'm worried about the bag handle Fondler, who's going to be rolling through the airport. Some handles to Fondle. I'm a little scared about that. Yeah, I'm going to try to keep my own and hold my bags close to me so I don't see any weirdos.

Speaker 2:

Fondle handles my luggage. Luggage between the legs, my friend, that's all I can tell you. Luggage between the legs, Otherwise he gonna come sit next to you and he gonna fondle that handle?

Speaker 1:

Oh for sure, if you know. You know Long-time listeners, you know.

Speaker 2:

Oh man, what about me? What about me? Are you alive? Are you doing great? I'm doing just fantastic. In all honesty, I really am. I really am doing great.

Speaker 1:

I can tell there's times I got to say it, there's times where I can't tell where you're being sarcastic and real. So I'm happy you clarified that. Well, can you tell right now?

Speaker 2:

Right now I feel like you're being genuine. Oh well, that's good, I am. So I mean.

Speaker 1:

Oh good.

Speaker 2:

Okay, I'm doing great. I posted in the Discord very proud of my wife winning this big Elden Ring contest. We have a 10-foot statue. It's going to be in our house soon because of the fruits of her labor. Even I get a little bit of the winnings here, with just statue of a creepy dude, creepy Elden Ring boss, going to be in my house. I can't wait. It's been a good few weeks, but you know like things have been good at work too. In all honesty, I really feel like all of the pain that you've heard me go through the last two years and two months. According to our internal systems, which I don't think are accurate, it really led to finally feeling like I got a handle on things, which is rare. It's rare for me to feel that, but you know it's good.

Speaker 1:

That is so nice. You had your event coming up. You know your company's kind of turning a corner and doing well. From what I, what I hear, that's so exciting. It is exciting. Things are going well there and obviously on the home front, your wife winning that competition. It does sound like life is good. You got to embrace these moments, be in them and realize it's not always going to be this way. You sure do.

Speaker 2:

You sure do, and I just got to ensure it stays this way. So that's really like my day-to-day. Now is how do I keep the machine running smoothly, which is a weird position for me to be in. I've never been here before. I've always chased my tail.

Speaker 1:

I was going to say you're chasing your tail or fighting fires, right so?

Speaker 2:

when you're actually ahead yeah. What does one do? It's very strange, but you know, a new journey for Bruce has begun.

Speaker 1:

I love it. That's awesome. Well, that's great to hear. Thanks, buddy, sure is.

Speaker 2:

Great to say we don't really have news today because, honestly, I was looking the world sucks right now and, like there's nothing I can tell you that you don't want to hear and you already know. You already know it's just the worst out there. So I got nothing. Unless you have something, clark, I say we forego it and go straight into the topic.

Speaker 1:

I've got a game for you. Oh, I love games.

Speaker 2:

Are you ready? Yes, it's going to be a very quick game, but I'm going to ask you anyway.

Speaker 1:

Okay, All right, this segment is called Real News or Fake News.

Speaker 2:

Oh my gosh, oh my gosh, oh my gosh.

Speaker 1:

Let's go, I'm ready. This is literally on the spot thinking. So I don't know how this is going to go, but we're going to. We're going to run with it. Ok, I'm down. All right, are you ready? Do you think employment or unemployment is on the rise, or it's actually pretty stable out there?

Speaker 2:

Unemployment is stable.

Speaker 1:

Stable. So the fact that people think you know so many people are unemployed, you know so many layoffs are happening, you think that's fake news?

Speaker 2:

I think that's fake news.

Speaker 1:

I'd agree. I'd agree. I've been seeing a lot of articles. I actually it's interesting because I have a lot of people around me that were struggling to find employment for the jobs that they want, even in technology, and then I just kept seeing all these articles that it was like actually you know, less layoffs are happening than ever.

Speaker 1:

More jobs are opening up than ever. Could it be some of those ghost jobs? Maybe, but it's so many that it doesn't feel that way, like there's. Some of these jobs have to be legit and the of these jobs have to be legit and the unemployment rate.

Speaker 2:

Like people are getting hired both the people that were kind of looking for for new work around me actually end up finding a job. Just the other week. It's uh, and I, I think I see I see that in my own industry as well like I'm currently budgeting for headcount on my team my entire company's budgeting for headcount right now. I see a lot of people getting jobs. On linkedin I see a lot of hiring. It's.

Speaker 2:

I think what's happened is there has been a disruption and I didn't want to talk about AI, but damn it. There has been a disruption because of AI, but it hasn't been the kind of disruption that we all expected. It's it's just sort of said okay, some roles are being eliminated. Unfortunately, it's a lot of people in media and entertainment like video games, movies, production studios like they're getting hit the hardest because AI just seems to come for the creative. You know, someone posted in our Discord I think it might have been Restrepo the meme about like maybe it wasn't, I don't know who posted it, but there was a meme about like how AI should be doing laundry and instead, you know, it's creating art. Like AI should be doing laundry so we can create art and instead AI's creating art, like AI should be doing laundry, so we can create art and instead AI is creating art and we're doing laundry.

Speaker 1:

That was in our discord, right? I did not see that, but that's so true I'm not making that up, I'm not making that up, I'm pretty sure, but that is so true, like, as I'm thinking about it, that is absolutely wild. Yes, but it's the opposite of that. It's like doing these ridiculous things like Will Smith eating spaghetti and it's like no one asked for that, no one wants that no one wants it and you're just ruining everything by doing this.

Speaker 2:

And maybe it's not in our discord. Maybe I'm having a stroke right now and everything's not okay, but now and everything's not okay, but uh, yeah. So I think what's actually happened is a lot of people have left these roles or have been asked to leave these roles and just taking up jobs elsewhere. Like you know, graphic designers still need it in a lot of corporate landscape, not just video games, movies, you know, media it's. Everyone needs a designer for their website, everyone needs a designer for their logos and things like that. So so I think you're just moving from jobs they enjoyed to the corporate soul sucking hellscape that all of us have learned to live in love. So, and they're so excited about it, yeah, yeah, I don't think unemployment is rising, if anything.

Speaker 1:

I would. I would assume the opposite. This is Bruce being sarcastic. So now you guys are learning the difference. We did the not sarcastic in the beginning, we did the sarcastic now. Now you've got your meter set.

Speaker 2:

I think I get a little more nasally when I'm sarcastic, like it's a little back of the throat. It's how you can tell.

Speaker 1:

Just starts deep down, fair enough, yeah yeah, I agree, fake news, it does seem, at least in the tech industry. From what I've seen from some articles and from data points, it does feel like actually the employment rate is pretty good right now in comparison to other prior periods, so absolutely Well, that was our real news, or fake?

Speaker 2:

news. What a great game. I will say I do think it sucks. There's not a number to represent this, but I think more people are working more jobs than ever before. I do believe that. So people holding multiple jobs, either part-time or full-time, I would absolutely say it's at an all-time high now.

Speaker 1:

Right.

Speaker 2:

If I had to guess.

Speaker 1:

That actually to bring you back into reality of our Discord server. Somebody did post about somebody working multiple jobs. They had 10 monitors up or whatever and they're like yeah, I work three hours a week and work 10 jobs, pulling in like a million dollars a year. I mean Automated, all that. I'm like more power to them, power to you If you can find out how to game the system like that, please, by all means take advantage.

Speaker 2:

I'm in too many. You know what I think. If I was an individual contributor, though like if I was just a tech writer I could probably take on 10 jobs. Yeah, yeah.

Speaker 1:

I think maybe, like I think, data entry, I think because I could automate it. You know what I mean. I think I could work a lot of jobs and like keep up enough in the chats to make it feel like I'm a real person and not a bot, but I would automate the crap out of those jobs yeah, I think it's how many meetings are you in?

Speaker 2:

That's what really limits you from having the multiple job.

Speaker 1:

That should be the question when you're interviewing, if you want to know if it's going to be like a laid back job or if you're going to have to be like all hands on deck. How many meetings should I expect every week, Every week? How many meetings should I expect every hour?

Speaker 2:

Is it one or is it two?

Speaker 1:

Exactly, is it more than two. Will I be quadruple booked, at times in my second week in the company, probably, and then it's like maybe I shouldn't work here. That sounds like a bad idea.

Speaker 2:

These are the real questions you need to ask, though, to be real, like I should definitely, if I ever interview again, which I'm sure one day I will how many meetings do you do in a day for someone of my role? Just asking, just curious, curious, just curious whether or not I want to run from this interview screaming with my head in my hands.

Speaker 1:

You know it'd be so funny if you're like. Well, you know, usually during a day you'd have like four or five meetings Like okay, I think this interview is over. Thanks, just hang up.

Speaker 2:

I'm not all in it now. This interview is already too much like a meeting.

Speaker 1:

I'm out, peace the interview starts and they're like okay, yeah, let's go ahead and get started. Before we get started, I just need to ask you a question.

Speaker 2:

This one's ain't for me sorry guy, I'll see you later, maybe. Like is it salary? It's like no, actually no nothing to do with it.

Speaker 1:

I would have taken pennies for meetings.

Speaker 2:

I'll do the job for free. How many meetings am I gonna be in a day, though? Like that's really what's, gonna, love it, or leave it for me?

Speaker 1:

oh, that's hilarious. I love this. Yeah, so that's the news. And you know what's even funnier about this episode? And I'm so I'm just cracking up on the inside because you said you don't want to talk about ai. I didn't want to bring up ai in the news and then, funny enough, the topic today is on. You guessed it.

Speaker 2:

AI, how dare you? Is this a troll episode? I'm done All right Interview over. I'm leaving Peace.

Speaker 1:

Corporate strategy finished. Hey, don't tell the listeners this, but for a future episode. One time I actually want to do that and end the podcast.

Speaker 2:

Leave this, but, uh, for a future episode one time I actually want to do that, like end the podcast, so leave it blank, absolutely. We'll go soprano style last episode, cut to black and then they'll never hear from us again. Clark, I'm just impressed you know that reference.

Speaker 1:

Like I'm proud of you have you watched the sopranos I? I've seen it, so funny enough.

Speaker 1:

Obviously, that show's been out forever I watched the whole thing like two years ago a little side side topic here and I didn't look up anything. I didn't know anything about it. So I guess the last episode it happens and I literally was like wait, did my like power just cut? It's like is the internet down? Like what happened? And like I'm checking it. I'm like it's the end of it here and my wife comes in and she's just like you don't know about this. I'm like what are you talking about? She's like this is the way it ends. Like everyone, I've never seen that. She even said she's like I've never seen the show and I know this. And I'm like yeah, oh man, I'm an idiot. But it just was such like times that the show was where you couldn't really look things up on the internet like find those answers. People were probably like this is insane, like there's got to be a mistake. Two things did you?

Speaker 2:

so you don't remember when hillary clinton had an ad campaign for her presidency that literally parodied that last scene, did they? Oh my gosh, yes, you have to look it up after this episode. Yes, uh. Second thing I had a similar experience very recently is we watched a session and I I'd never watched any of it when it was on tv. So then we kind of watched like seasons one, two, three and then four, right when it was finishing and I didn't know that season four was the last season and the show ends On such like a high note I'm like man, I can't wait to see what they do next season with that ending and it's like no, there is no next season, oh no.

Speaker 1:

It is the worst feeling when they leave you wanting more or they have like loose ends that aren't quite closed and you're just like wait a second.

Speaker 2:

That can, or they have like loose ends that aren't quite closed and you're just like wait, wait a second. That can't be it. There's got to be something else to this. You know it's, it's funny but like in retrospect, I'd always prefer something ends early on top, then gets bad and I sour these like that's game of thrones for me. I won't watch the new Game of Thrones show Really Period Because of how bad the ending was to the original run. I just can't. I've heard the new series is actually better than the original run, but I just can't do it. It's ruined for me. I'd much rather a non-satisfying leave you wanting more ending than to end it poorly.

Speaker 1:

Fair enough. That's like lost for me.

Speaker 2:

I love the show loss and that last episode you're the last.

Speaker 1:

Like couple episodes like what the heck? This is not what I've been watching this whole entire time. Like this made no sense, terrible ending sour's the experience, and then you just don't want to think about it anymore very true, I do want to re-watch the show, but I'm gonna skip the last episodes because I just, I just can't good plan good plan. All right, so lay it on me.

Speaker 2:

I've delayed us long enough. What are? We talking about today, Clark.

Speaker 1:

AI. It's running your life, it's Apple intelligence Just kidding Artificial intelligence. I wanted to talk about today how you are using AI in your day-to-day life, if at all, and then I have a question for you about your thoughts on AI and how you kind of see it going. So I want to start with just talking about how we're using it, how you're using it, how I'm using it to hopefully help the listeners, because I think it can be a really great tool, and if you're not using it, you should, just to get ready for all the advances that are going to come. But I really want to hear from you, bruce how are you using it, if at all?

Speaker 2:

So not much, in all honesty, but I do use it. So and I'll give you the full rundown because it's not a lot I use Copilot, which is Microsoft's AI. I actually go to the website copilotmicrosoftcom or whatever the heck it is. I got it bookmarked. You do it on the website? Interesting? Yeah? No, I only go to the browser, and my only use case for AI is, I will say and this is I'll give you an actual, real example from this week I'm writing a blog about the Olympics and cybersecurity. What are some things that have happened with cybersecurity in the Olympics that I could use to incorporate in this blog? And the reason why I love Copilot is it cites all the sources. So it'll spit out a list and I got some really great factoids and cited sources that I can then pull in. And then in my mind I'll take these little bullets and then build a story around it that I write myself.

Speaker 1:

That's great. So for you it's more of like brainstorming or rather than and it's interesting, rather than like going to Google search and doing all that research yourself. You now have something that basically can do that for you.

Speaker 2:

Yes, and part of me this is the cynical part, like part of me laments the fact that I can't do good research anymore, because I used to be a pretty good researcher in finding things. But the dead internet theory supposes that AI has taken over everything anyway, and most of what you're going to find is AI oriented. So it's probably better for me to use AI to snuff out the good stuff than for me to go and try to parse all of the garbage Like it's. The internet has become such a crap heap that to not use AI is folly. You will fall into the trap of falling for fake news, fake AI generated garbage that leveraging AI is kind of the only way you can combat AI, so I do.

Speaker 1:

Fair enough Controversial question for you. Do you actually need to do research anymore? I'm saying it from a perspective of for the work you do what you provide. Would that be beneficial at all? Obviously, in like healthcare and science and stuff like that, yeah, you know, there's a lot of times where there's a lot of things that really need to be deeply researched. Ai probably isn't your source you want to go to, so things you do like do you even need to be good at researching?

Speaker 2:

I mean like I'm not developing product you know I'm in marketing so like I'm writing stories, I'm crafting narratives, I'm trying to convince people that the things I'm putting out there are worth their time. To get them into the funnel, into the funnel, out of the funnel, right. So like I'm not doing the kind of research that warrants actual lab time or, you know, time in the, the library looking at old philosophers and what they have to say. It's just not me, it's not my job.

Speaker 2:

I do think research still exists, just like you said, you know health care and sciences and things like that, but I think for most of us, the answers we need are on the Internet and the best way to find them is with AI, specifically like an AI, like co-pilot, I think. Like I'll just say I hate Microsoft the most, but I do think they have the best AI in the market today when it comes to my specific use case and I've tried them all. So like it's, it's really leveled up that game and I don't think a normal 99% of us don't need anything more than Copilot search engine for most of our research needs.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I agree completely. That's a really good use case and I think for anybody listening that needs to do research and finds themselves scouring the internet to find information and verify the information, just skip a step Now. You don't need to search for it over the internet and find all those things yourself. Get something that's curated, that can help you to your point, find the good stuff, and then you can verify it after. And I think that's so key that people forget. Don't just take it for what it is For. Whatever your use case is, please verify it. Don't just start spitting it out or sharing with people without actually looking through it because you could be sharing some really bad crap because ai is not perfect.

Speaker 2:

Well, it's funny, like in this olympics cyber security article I was writing like I I read this one thing that co-pilot sent me that said there was 450 million attacks on the tokyo olympics when it was running and I was like that's a large number so I then took that and I I was like I gotta fact check this.

Speaker 2:

No, it's like this is Cisco published? You know they partnered with the Olympic Committee to provide their networking and cyber resilience and yeah, no, 450 million attacks. Now none of them got through, which is even more impressive. But you know, like that's, these are the kind of things that you hear from an AI. It's always good to go fact check.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, absolutely. That is another really good tip. It's like, yeah, use it for those things, but then fact check it after. But yeah, that number seems crazy. Like, listen to your gut a little bit and be like I should verify this. After you verify it, you might find that it's true, which is surprising, but it's at least verified. I actually like a lot that Copilot cites its sources, because I think, if I remember, like chat GPT really doesn't. You can probably ask it to, but it doesn't from what I remember. You can probably ask it to, but it doesn't from what I remember.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I don't recall. I mean it didn't when I used it. I haven't used ChatGPT in a long time, like I exclusively use Copilot now, so yeah. I couldn't go back just because I love it. It doesn't just cite them, it makes statements and it puts little footnotes where each individual thing comes from, so like a single line could have three different sources in it. So good, I love it.

Speaker 1:

Is Copilot free? Can I just like hop on there? Yeah yeah, you just need a Microsoft account, very cool, so you don't use what's interesting. Oh sorry, bruce, go ahead.

Speaker 2:

I will also say we do use AI to generate the show notes for this, and it comes directly through our podcast provider, buzzsprout. So I don't know what they're using. It could be GPT, but the thing I like about it is it listens to the podcast and then it just does a nice summary, so we don't have to.

Speaker 1:

Absolutely, and it's actually what goes into a newsletter too. So if you're signing up for that, you actually get the AI summaries Fun facts with Clark and Bruce. But I like that a lot. Yeah, copilot, I'm interested, though like you don't use it. Well, you're not a Microsoft like Office 365 shop, right, we are. Oh, so you don't use Copilot integrating your other tools like Outlook or Teams?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I would. I'd rather get punched in the face by an actual robot.

Speaker 1:

That is surprising because they have integrated, I think, in every single tool. Now I know we have it integrated in email teams and I think it's even in like Word in some cases and a couple other things. So I'm surprised you just use like the whole entire online chat tool rather than using the integrated pieces.

Speaker 2:

So maybe I should because, in all honesty, like I was looking for an email just a couple days ago that I got in the last month and I was searching every single keyword I could think of to get this email to bubble up and it just wouldn't. So maybe I should try copilot in the microsoft suite, but uh, I have not.

Speaker 1:

I'm resonating so well with that example, because Microsoft, whatever you're doing with Outlook, dear God, figure out how to index and search, because I try to find emails. I'm like I know I sent that yesterday. How can I not find this? This is insane, it's unacceptable it really is.

Speaker 2:

How can Copilot go find me every piece of research I could need and and then some to go write a thousand-word blog and I can't find an email about the MBO Excel spreadsheet template, which all of those words should really be all I need to find the email and it's not there.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, it's absolutely atrocious. And hey, granted, I'll give them this. Maybe it's our organizations that set it up really crappy, but I'd wager to say your organization probably, given your size, has not done a ton of customization. You're just using a lot of stuff out of the box.

Speaker 2:

It's too small, yeah and I I'm a good archivist. Like I archive things that I don't think I need. I'm very good about keeping things in the inbox that I I'm gonna work on. Like there's no reason I shouldn't be able to find this email and I just couldn't, and I had to ask someone to send it to me again, which I hate doing.

Speaker 1:

So thanks, I've literally driven myself crazy looking for an email that I sent. I'm like I swear to God I sent this and I searched for like a good 15 minutes and I was like this is going to drive me absolutely insane. I don't know if you have this little thing, but little things that like should be easy, that you can't figure them out. They just drive me up a wall. It's like one of my pet peeves. I'm like how can something so simple be wasting so much of my time? I resorted to reaching out to someone I knew would have been on that email and I was like, hey, did you get an email from me that was around this topic? And I had them confirm it because I could not find it. I'm like this is insane.

Speaker 2:

I just don't get it. I don't get it, but it's wild. You might've just convinced me to convince myself to give Copilot in the integrated suite a shot.

Speaker 1:

I think it's worth a shot, but you, you brought up a really good use case and I think for anyone that's you know doing similar things, it's certainly a great place to use for, you know, for initial research, thought starters, brainstorming, whatever it might be, and it does give you all those sources, which is great. So don't waste your time making your own list and kind of curating it and trying to read each of the summaries. It'll take you forever. Just use some sort of AI, use one of the tools out there, and it'll really give you a jumpstart. I'm surprised that's all you use for it. Yeah, I'm surprised that's all you use for it. Yeah, that's it. That and the show notes for this really.

Speaker 2:

I mean, like you know, I'll talk to the S word on my iPhone and watch her fail to do simple tasks like turn on the lights. You know it's really frustrating. I'll, you know, say, text my wife and she'll literally say the wrong name and I'm like I literally just told you the name to text. How difficult is this for you? So I like, unless I'm driving, I try not to engage with the s word.

Speaker 1:

I know at all costs.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, it's crazy too because, like it's even simple names, my dad on my phone is dad and I'll say call dad and dad and it will get it wrong and I'm like how in the world, calling Mark Browning, there's nothing even close to that. Excuse me, how did you get that? How many letters it just like it. Literally it almost makes you when you're driving, because I try and do that. You know, I try to stay off my phone when I'm driving, but it almost makes you. How can this be so terrible? Thank God an update is on its way this fall, because I just can't. It's so frustrating, I can't.

Speaker 2:

I don't get it, as an Apple fan, how it can be this bad. Still, I'm hopeful for Apple intelligence, but at the same time, there's a little bit of weary caution here, because it's taken them this long to just get simple tasks done. So absolutely yeah. No, I don't. I don't like using it. So I'm very curious. This is your topic, Clark.

Speaker 1:

What's you up to? So I do a few things. I've actually found it. I've talked about tidbits, but I figured you know, an actual episode would be dedicated to AI, rather than every single episode me bringing up news about AI would be good for us to talk through, give an update on how we're using it so everybody else who's listening can come up with new ideas and hopefully help some people. I use it in a couple cases, as I've mentioned before, I'm in a lot of meetings and keeping up, like, with back-to-back meetings and action items and notes and all that is really really hard, even with the integrated tools, because they give you like transcripts and all that you know. We're an office shop too, so we use Teams. They give you like transcripts of meetings, but it's not clear, like what the action items are and what. I found extremely helpful because the S word on your phone is so bad. I use the chat GPT app and I basically just like speak into it in between meetings so that I remember the highlights and the action items.

Speaker 2:

Can you give an example of like what you prompted?

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yeah, absolutely so. I had a meeting with my boss the other day and I usually leave that meeting with a lot of action items, and so what I'll do is I'll just bring it up really quick, like as I'm walking back to my office or something like that, like as I'm walking back to my office or something like that. Or by the time I'm in my office and I'll say hey, you know, I just got out of this meeting. I just need some help taking notes and organizing them into categories of you know action items, things I need to follow up on, or you know people I need to ping in order to get some answers. And then I'll just You're talking with your mouth. I'm literally like then I just start spewing things off.

Speaker 1:

I'm like Project X we're behind because of X, y and Z Follow up on where they are for approvals on this and I'll literally just do that for like five minutes. I'll just talk to it and it comes up with such a clear and concise list in the categories that I told it to in the beginning and it does a really good job. I wouldn't say it's like 100, but it's like 80, 85 and it's really solid. That's impressive. It's really good. I actually blew my boss away because she's busier than I am and I was like I showed her. I was like, hey, this is what I'm doing, I think this would help you, and she's like holy cow, like this would change my whole entire day. I'm like you should start using it. Does she do it now? No, probably not. She's kind of old school, so that's on her.

Speaker 1:

She wants to do it but her taking the time to like learn how to do it, even though I'm like you just download the app and you're just talking to it. It would just take her a little too long.

Speaker 2:

I'm wondering, like, if this is something I could do with copilot, because that might encourage me to go beyond the web browser, cause it is good Like there are times when I'll I get off a meeting and be like dang I didn't take notes during the meeting. I probably should put something down right now, and then I don't, because I just don't want to type anymore.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yeah, you should definitely give it a shot, and I think the multimodal input and the fact that you can just use your voice and talk naturally into it. It's so much better than like typing, because typing takes so much time. You have to write things coherently and your brain just wants you to type things coherently when you're talking. You can just have a conversation and then it will glean all those actions for you, which is really awesome.

Speaker 2:

It is huge, Like it's a big differentiator being able to speak, so I'm down to try it. You've convinced me.

Speaker 1:

Give it a shot. Also. The second thing I use it for is when I'm prepping presentations. I'll have a couple bullet points. You for is when I'm prepping presentations, I'll have a couple of bullet points.

Speaker 1:

You know, I every deck that I do, and I don't know if you're similar, if you have any tips on this, but when I build out decks, I basically just build a shell to start. I'm like, okay, well, let's start with kind of what am I trying to get out of this meeting? And then I start building the agenda out of that. And then, essentially, I start writing notes on each of the slides like, OK, this one, here's a couple of thoughts, and it's like a couple of words, a sentence or two. And then I come back later and I actually make it good and actually make it look good.

Speaker 1:

I use AI and I use ChatGPT for this to just type in those thoughts with a little more detail, Be like, hey, expand on this, or make it feel more like a vision statement for where we're heading. Or you know, use, you know standard KPIs like engagement, engagement, acquisition, whatever it might be, and kind of just rattle those things off and it gives you some really good, well-written things that articulates what you were trying to get across without you having to think about it.

Speaker 2:

That is nice, I will say in the past. I have a Grammarly subscription, so you know they have their own little AI thing. I have a Grammarly subscription, so you know they have their own little AI thing. But I've definitely asked it to shorten things I've written before Because a lot of times you got to you know, when you're doing marketing submissions, it's like 150 words or less. So it's like, okay, I got to trim this down. Yeah, I'm not a good enough judge of like what's important to cut it and I said, hey, can you make this 150 words? And sometimes it does good. Sometimes I got to step in and do it, but I like it for that expand, shrink concept.

Speaker 2:

My problem, though, like with this one specifically, is AI speak in general. It's very like programmatic, which is weird because it's been trained in human language. But anytime an AI writes something, whether you know it's completely on its own or it's prompted by you or encouraged by you like it's going to sound like an AI has written it. So I'm curious do you go? Obviously you have to go in afterwards and then make it your own, but how much time do you spend doing that, versus how much time you would, just as you just had the thoughts and put them down, do it yourself.

Speaker 1:

That, I think, is a really interesting question and I think it's something that you kind of have to monitor those things and find those things where it's good and where it's bad and what works for you and what doesn't. Because exactly to your point and I'll talk about it in other use cases I have. But there's times when I'm doing something I'm like that took me way longer than me just doing it myself, and I think in my case, for the most part it's nothing like crazy long. So it's pretty easy for me to like hop in there and change a word. I'm like why did I use synergy six times in the sentence?

Speaker 2:

Sometimes the grammar of AI is terrible.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, but it's learning from people, which you know is exactly why, yeah, you've got a faulted source, so you're going to have a faulted output. I actually I use it for LinkedIn posts, and something I like a lot with AI is you can actually say like, hey, change the tone to be a little more casual or a little more serious or a little more fun, or like reduce the. I don't know what it is. Ai loves using emojis and I say like, hey, stop the emojis, like there are way too many of these. But it does a really good job and, to your point, it's kind of trained off what LinkedIn is. So it's interesting. When you think about that, you're like, oh yeah, it's acting this way because it knows LinkedIn posts are like this now, where people are putting an emoji at the front of their first sentence, the last of the first sentence and all over the description. So it's really funny, like how it picks up on those trends and it kind of gives you a remembrance of being like oh yeah, that's just how LinkedIn is now, that's right.

Speaker 2:

You know I wasn't going to say anything, but I know all of your posts are AI Every time I see your posts.

Speaker 2:

I can't, I cannot read this. That's hilarious, but I can tell it's just it's's and that's the thing is there. You know there are people out there that do not care, they'll never know. It's totally cool, it's great. I'm glad for you, but I can, I can smell it from a mile away. I really can't. I see it, I read it. I'm like this is ai, and I know you're not the only one, clark, I'm not putting you on blast here, but there are some people.

Speaker 1:

I'm using my tools.

Speaker 2:

Yes, there are some people that rely very heavily on AI and LinkedIn and they think they're pretty smart. And I'm like friend, I can see you, I can smell it. I can smell the metal in your fingers creating these posts.

Speaker 1:

That's incredible. Yeah, you're exactly right. Yeah, I use it because I try to be consistent and I think it's just good because it expands on topics where I'm just like I don't feel like writing all this detail, and so I do appreciate that. But I can also totally tell your point where people might be like this just doesn't feel genuine, I don't want to go into a tangent but like, why are we so like?

Speaker 2:

why do we need to post? Why you know like you need the ai to write the post for us, but do we ever? I made this, I made this statement like a week ago, which and now I'm just thinking about it non-stop because it's like I'm kind of right is we? The ai was supposed to be our assistant, but in many ways we've just become the assistant to the AI and now we let them do the work and we just click the button. And what are we if not the tool for the AI to work through? And you know I'm not cool with that.

Speaker 1:

So, yeah, I love that this is getting you worked up. I love it. But you're so right, I have long-term motives for where I think this is going to be necessary.

Speaker 2:

I know you do. We've talked about this. I'm not judging, I'm not putting you on blast, but I am saying I see you and there are others out there and I definitely see you 99%.

Speaker 1:

Of.

Speaker 2:

LinkedIn is AI nonsense anyway. I try to avoid the platform now because it's just, it's just nonsense you know what I love?

Speaker 1:

I love coming across your posts because everything's like AI and this long drawn out thing or like something that shouldn't be on, you know, linkedin, it should be on social media. And then I get to yours and you're like read this, it doesn't suck. And I just die every time because I'm like you are absolutely right and you know it's actually so funny um, it's how you stand out in a crowd.

Speaker 2:

Now. I'll tell you that right now, like I get the, the number of impressions I get today versus what I used to get, I haven't changed. I have not changed, but the world around me has so interesting now people just want something that was touched by a human being. They're desperate for it. The children yearn for the mind.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, oh, that's so interesting.

Speaker 1:

Speaking of my, I'm getting my last point here, but the last case that I have, because it's kind of into my longer term motives doing some coding on the side. I was curious. I'm like how good can this be? And we were both. If anybody's new listening to this that doesn't know, we were both software engineers in a previous life and the amount of time as a software engineer you spend like Googling stuff is crazy. And I honestly thought I was like lying to myself. When I first started. I felt like I had imposter syndrome because I was like this can't be normal. And then the more senior engineers I was around is like no, no, it's normal. Like sometimes I just forget the syntax on how to like write an array with a couple objects in it. I have to Google that and so it's a totally normal thing and that's not. You know, the point of the job is not to memorize how to code an exact language, it's understanding the concepts and putting things together and that's way more valuable.

Speaker 1:

So I was curious. I was like, okay, you know I'm working on a couple of side things, I'm just curious how it will do. And so I started playing around with it and I'll give a very specific example, because I think you know it'd be useful to have that level of context. So I had to. I had to write something that took a CSV and basically it had a bunch of fields in it that you know was just part of this data object and I was like hey, I need you to go through and find unique instances of this and then I need you to output it in this forum or in this certain form factor, so that way I can put it inside code as an object that I can test something with.

Speaker 2:

I actually like that.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and I literally just typed like that into it. I gave it some specifics on like the column names that I wanted, the output format that I wanted of like an array of objects with the key value pairs being like camel case. So I got a little specific with it. It wrote all the code and Bruce it compiled it. I put it in a file, I saved that file, I ran it and I was like holy cow, that's exactly what I needed. What language? So it was in JavaScript it was in.

Speaker 2:

Javascript is where I asked to output it.

Speaker 1:

So I just ran it with no the worst one with node, and it even, like allowed me to choose the csv like it was entered in the command line. I was like holy cow, holy crap, I would have spent so much time. Because the first thing I did and you can probably relate to this is I was like there's got to be like an online tool that just parses csvs and give me the format I want, like I can choose and customize, I can just drag and drop it in. I looked for like 20 minutes and I was like there's nothing that's doing exactly what I want, like I'm going to have to custom code this, which I can do. It's just going to be tedious and annoying for me to remember how to write something like this that can parse a freaking CSV.

Speaker 1:

And so I tried it with AI and I was like holy cow, this is exactly what I needed. It was awesome. So I was kind of blown away because I was like man, this would have saved me so much time. We used to story for listeners, we used to write a lot of stuff in PowerShell and we'd write these custom scripts that would be like long and probably not well formatted and you'd just be banging your head on the wall of having to do stuff like this, of reading output files from like CSVs, and we'd have to do all custom. Or I literally had a book of like how to write PowerShell and that's how I was learning, and so something like this would have saved us so much time.

Speaker 2:

I love this, like no complaints, no notes, no shade. I think this is great and the reason why is because so much of programming is not can you memorize. It's not. You're not speaking a language Like you know I'm. I'm learning Japanese right now and a big part of that is just memorizing the words and the grammar and the order and, like, your brain has to get that right, otherwise you're going to speak garbled. But in programming there is no need to memorize the order, the syntax, the individual things that make each language unique. You know they call this one a class, they call this one a case or whatever. I don't remember because it's been years since I programmed. But like being able to do the pseudocode or to talk about the theory of the thing you're trying to program, understanding the instructions and the rules and then having the machine speak the machine language Brilliant, I love it.

Speaker 1:

No notes. And for that, you know, the nice thing was it was just like a one-off tool, so it's not like I had to integrate it into a code base of like a running enterprise product. It's like I just needed this stupid task and there's nothing that'll do it quite right for me.

Speaker 1:

So I can either fuddle around or try to format the CSV to make it work on one of these online tools, or I can just have it write me this little utility and it did the dang job, bruce, and I was so happy. I was like this is huge and I found mocking data.

Speaker 2:

I can be like, hey, just give me a data set of cities and their states in America the capitals or something, and it literally just spews it out and you're like, wow, I don't have to write that crap anymore and waste my time. This is incredible. That is great. I think that is a fantastic use of it. Um, you know the the unfortunate part of this is that will lead to people eventually losing their jobs absolutely, because you'll just need the architects, but you won't need the, the slave coders, basically that role are building something bigger and better.

Speaker 1:

They're just doing the manual crap. No one wants to the grunt work, yeah.

Speaker 2:

I mean, you'll still need the debugger. You'll always need the debugger and the QA, because as much as we'd love for a machine to automate that, the machine is the thing we're testing against. But I do see that if it's working as well as you say it is, there could be some job loss in the future there.

Speaker 1:

One thing I noticed, though, because I'm using ChatGPT on their browser, so I'm not using like an integrated copilot tool or anything like that. One thing I noticed is like it quickly loses context, and so this is one of the drawbacks you could like, after they give you something you'd be like OK, okay, I want to tweak that slightly, and I want to tweak this, and I want to tweak that it quickly just forgets what you had before, and so, even though I was making small tweaks here and there, I was testing it, over time it'd be it turned into exactly what we were talking about earlier of. It took me more time to like just copy and paste and make and tell the thing to make the switches, instead of me just doing it manually.

Speaker 1:

So, it reached a point where I'm just like I'm wasting my time because it keeps on removing things that were there before and because I'm copying and pasting about a hundred lines of code. I'm not checking what lines are changing, I'm just copying and pasting it and now I need to jump in and I need to understand it. I need to do the thing, and I could keep on trying to iterate with the tool, or I could just jump in there with my knowledge and build the thing that I wanted, which is much more efficient and much faster.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, no, I think.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it's probably really good for like the first pass and you know what you're talking about. It's the limitation of most AIs in general is they're generative, they're meant to go and sound like they're giving you the right answer, but when you actually try to have like a long lived conversation where it needs to remember and recall and make judgments, it doesn also has this issue. Or if, because it was designed to be a programming-based AI, if it does refine and change without the kind of issues you're running into.

Speaker 1:

Right, I think, with something that's integrated into the IDE like a copilot.

Speaker 1:

that is constantly like reading the code that is on your screen with you, and so I think that is actually to your point, like purpose built to understand the code and not just like take an input and generate something new based on the context I had before. It's like it always has that reference because it's just right next to you and you can just type it in. So I think those integrated tools I want to try those next, but I think those would be much better at that use case than an outside tool. So I agree. Actually, something interesting you said language learning. I think is a super interesting one. One of the biggest hurdles that you'll have with something like Japanese when you live in America and you don't have a lot of times to practice it, is finding ways that you can practice it. So you know, previously people would just like find language learning groups or find someone that speaks it and they practice with them, and that's how they would like learn and get better beyond just vocabulary and be able to like really become proficient.

Speaker 1:

Now, with AI, there's a bunch of language learning learning tutors out there that basically you just kind of conversate with and you can do it multimodal, so you can do it for a voice, so you can do it via your computer, and it literally will just like have a conversation with you in that language and help you kind of work through it together. So it's really interesting to see like how that could help people learn languages much more efficiently than before.

Speaker 2:

I definitely need to practice my conversation skills, although like they're not, it's not quite there yet. You know it's it's hard. It's hard learning the language, but like I could see that being a huge benefit as well.

Speaker 1:

Yeah for sure. Especially, um, there's a couple of good ones out there that I've seen. I haven't tried them yet, but there's a couple of good ones out there that I've seen where they actually have, like they remember your conversations so they kind of gauge where you're at your professional level and then work with you for like basic conversations about things to be like okay, I think it's a little complex, let's take a step back to something easier.

Speaker 1:

So it's really cool how they can switch between the languages and actually work with you to understand how to speak and the right tones to use and so on. So it's pretty cool. That is cool. I like that. All right, my All right. My last question for you To close the episode is AI a product or is it more of just a feature on top of the products we already use?

Speaker 2:

What do you think is the?

Speaker 1:

future. Dang Clark, see you and I right now I think back to this conversation with you jumping into the browser and using Copilot, not integrating the tools. You're using it as a product. If you're using it integrated into the tools you already use you're already built products then you'd be using it as a feature. You think about, like Siri, oh, the S word sorry, sorry, folks, if I just triggered you. If you use the S word on your phone, that's really just a feature of your product, which is your iPhone. It's not like a separate product, but like using ChatGPT is a separate product and I have an app for it and it is completely separate. So I'm curious what you think the future is. And you've also seen, like another couple examples, some of those newer products that have failed, like the Humane AI Pen or whatever.

Speaker 1:

I don't know if you've seen that crap gimmicky stuff that has just failed miserably. I don't.

Speaker 2:

I don't, man, because the pin, the TaskRabbit, a lot of this stuff. It's using a feature as if it was a product, but big, but big. But here, and I cannot lie, I still think AI is a product. It's just an alpha. So, expanding on that, your LinkedIn posts, I can smell them. It's not ready yet. It's not ready to be the thing that we trust to do our jobs.

Speaker 2:

The way that Microsoft Word or Office or you know, sql database or Salesforce, all of those things are vetted, they work, they've been tested. They're billion dollar industries. Ai is probably a trillion dollar industry, but I don't think there's a single instance of a product that is fully baked, to the point where I would make a case to my CEO that we need to spend $50,000 a year to buy a suite of tools because it's just an alpha. Right, if the output was better, if the output was better than what I could do on my own today. Now we're talking product territory, but that's fair. You know, like it is, it is way more than a feature, but I don't think it's ready for prime time.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that's fair.

Speaker 1:

And I think it might be I you know, I didn't actually think of it the way you put it, but I agree with what you're saying. You know, with the way that you're kind of saying it, it's more like it's just not ready to be its full blown standalone product and, to be honest with you, I think it's going to be years, maybe a decade from now, until it gets to what you're saying it. That that's what it's going to be, you know, until it's truly going to like revolutionize everything. I think we're going to probably see for like the next five, 10 years, it's mainly going to be features on top of products we already have and it's going to help here and there, but it's not going to be like the most amazing thing in the world. And then, I think, a decade from now, it's just going to change. Because of this, I think that's what's going to enable.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, and I think the AI that blows us away is the AI that we don't realize. Is AI, yeah, like that is truly the mark of when it becomes product worthy? Is it no longer feels different? Now it's undistinguishable, right, indistinguishable?

Speaker 1:

yeah, it's whatever the word is I think the sign is going to be from my dumb brain. My dumb brain is saying the day I just toss my iphone to the side, I'm like I don't need you anymore. That's going to be like whoa, whoa, this is game changing Agree, agree. See, that wasn't too painful, we talked all about. Ai for a good 30 minutes.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, holy cow, wasn't ready for that. Didn't think I had it in me, but we got there.

Speaker 1:

Thanks, clark. Hopefully it was helpful to the people. Use AI, find ways it's going to make your life better and if you can automate eight jobs and pull on some crazy figure, paychecks.

Speaker 2:

That's honestly, that's what I'm the most curious about with our listeners is are you using it today and how? Like you know, we've given you our reasons. What are you using it for? How is it working for you and do share. Do share with us.

Speaker 2:

Join the Discord if you're not already in there, it's super easy to get in. You just go to our link tree. It's in the show notes. Just scroll down in your podcast platform of choice. You'll find our link tree. You can get all the places from there, like our website newsletter, our store page that doesn't work but, most importantly, the Discord, where you can hang out with us and share your AI victory or failure stories. But before we go real quick I know this has been a long one, but real quick before you go on your trip, clark, we have to play a quick game. It's the second half of the second half of our show. It's what Do you Meme? The game where we describe memes with words. And, clark, not only is it your turn, but you've been tagged and not only is it your turn, but you've been tagged.

Speaker 1:

Oh, I have I got added.

Speaker 2:

The message called me out specifically yes, so do, do, do us the favor and tell us what is the meme in the what do you meme channel and what is going on in there I would love to, and I'd like to start this by saying lero jenkins very nice, well executed.

Speaker 1:

I think that's all you need, right? The thing that I forgot.

Speaker 2:

Leroy Jenkins. Very nice, well executed.

Speaker 1:

I think that's all you need, right? The thing that I forgot, because in the last episode we were doing this and I'm so happy corporate correspondent Alex Restrepo posted this and tagged me, because I forgot how hilarious this part of this meme was. So if you guys know the thing, just search Leroy Jenkins, youtube it, please.

Speaker 2:

Everyone knows.

Speaker 1:

Even if you've seen it before, please do it because it always puts a smile on my face and I know it will for you too. But there's a point inside the video and this is what the meme's all about where they're like what are the chances of success here? This is all before they're about to go storm. I can't even remember exactly what it is. They're going to like go storm and do this raid or something like that in the game and they're like talking about the probability, like all right, everyone's got their task. Um, you know, I think there's a really good chance. What do you think the success rate is? Pete or something like that. And he's like there's a 32.33 percent repeating, of course chance that this isn't staged or that that they were going to be successful, and then like just runs in in the middle of that conversation, says let's do this. Leroy jenkins like oh shit, he's just going in there.

Speaker 2:

This isn't part of the plan damn it, leroy, you killed us all now, but that's not what the meme says. What does the meme say.

Speaker 1:

The meme says there's a 32.33 percent repeating, of course, chance that this isn't staged.

Speaker 2:

So this just goes back. Why is it? Why does it say that?

Speaker 1:

so was this custom by alex too. Did he custom make this he custom made this yeah that's incredible, what a guy. Um, but in the last episode, bruce was pointing out that this almost definitely was staged. But the real thing was probably real, like it actually probably happened like this, and then they had to go back and like record it. So they had to make it stage and like try to redo everything, and god bless them. God bless them for doing that, because it is an internet gift there's a.

Speaker 2:

There's a leroy jenkins in every corporate company in america. We hate them is we wish they would get fired. Unfortunately, they seem to just promote themselves up the ladder, but they're there. They are absolutely there. So while the video might not be true, the meme is true in our hearts.

Speaker 1:

Yep, absolutely. Everyone knows that person. Like if you're an engineer, you know you had like that launch that was happening one day, or a database migration. You guys spent like weeks planning it out. You got everything ready and then someone just jumped the gun and did something real stupid. They just started without anyone knowing and you're saying, oh crap, like it's happening, what are we going to do? They Leroyed it.

Speaker 2:

They Leroyed it that and reword it.

Speaker 1:

That's it.

Speaker 2:

Reword it right up. Well, thanks, clark. Thanks for playing, as always. If you guys want to submit a meme based on today's episode, all you gotta do is what I told you earlier Go to that link tree, get in our Discord, put that meme in the what Do you Meme channel, make it a good one, make it about AI, obviously and I will have to respond to or the next podcast, which is more Bruce and AI match made in heaven. We love it, as always. Thanks to our listeners for listening to the show. If you like what you hear, please do share it with your friends, your neighbors, your family or those you hate. Corporate strategy is also a great weapon, because there are certain people out there that absolutely despise the kind of vibe we're putting out in the world. So send it to your enemies, why not? Generates conversation.

Speaker 1:

I'll close this out. You ready? Oh, I'm ready, let's do it. And always remember, don't Leroy it.

Speaker 2:

Don't Leroy it. I'm Bruce and I'm Clark and you're on mute. We'll see you next week.

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